The Bay Area Body

"Body, Body, Bodies" presents 27 artists who take on the body for your pleasure and edification in a new exhibit in San Francisco produced by the Queer Cultural Center for the National Queer Arts Festival 2014.

BY Advocate.com Editors

June 06 2014 4:33 AM ET

The San Francisco Bay Area is known for it's strident activism, it's cultural riches, and a certain offbeat personal and visual sensibility. And lots and lots of LGBT people.

This history of civic engagement has nurtured visual art that pays special attention to the politics of the body as well as the body politic. For those who are denied access to traditional political means, or for those who voluntarily reject this, artists have used their own bodies as sites of political transformation or contestation.

The exhibit, "Body, Body, Bodies..."  presents 27 cutting edge artists who take on the body for your pleasure and edification.

It is part of this year’s festival, and the theme is “Body Politic/s.” This exhibition is produced by the Queer Cultural Center as a visual arts centerpiece of the National Queer Arts Festival 2014.

"Body, Body, Bodies…" is presented at SOMArts through participation in the Affordable Space Program, which provides below-market rental space, production and publicity assistance to nonprofit organizations.

Queer Cultural Center
Exhibition June 7–28, 2014.
Opening event Saturday, June 7, 2–5pm.
Gallery hours: Tues–Fri, 12-7pm and Sat, 12–5pm.
934 Brannan St. (between 8th & 9th)


Alvarado
wet front 29, 2013
gum Arabic painting on paper
44″ X 60″

Artist statement: Some of these images are from a project I am working on, dealing with Immigration Reform; the project is called “50-60 Wet Backs” in response to congressman Don Young’s insensitive comment about the 50-60 wetbacks last year.

 

Carlos Brache
Dispenser

The artist uses a dispenser until its contents are exhausted.

 

Briccetti
Work Shoes, 2008
Oil on canvas
22″x28″

Artist statement: My work looks at the worker, mainly the female worker, and her alienation from her work. Self-portraits by-proxy, these images show working women trapped by their physical bodies in places and jobs that seem empty and route. Some of the work shows these women soldiering on through their daily grind despite madness erupting around them, others simply pushing onward through the drudgery. Using the female body, and in particular a retro 50s-70s female body, as a trope for wanting to break free from society’s imposed rules, further elucidates the sense of disaffection felt by the subjects in this work.

Tags: Art

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