BY Laurie Pike

April 09 2010 4:00 AM ET

JACKIE WARNER 02 X390 (SYE WILLIAMS) | ADVOCATE.COM

She also got a book deal after Work Out was canceled, and for the next several months she spent five days a week, two hours a day writing.

The result is This Is Why You’re Fat (and How to Get Thin Forever): Eat More, Cheat More, Lose More—and Keep the Weight Off (Wellness Central, $24.99). The book is due out in late April. While the title could stand to lose a few inches, the content is all killer, no filler.

“It’s different and better than anything else out there,” Warner boasts in the introduction. Casting the Atkins diet as unmaintainable (“deprivation doesn’t work”), she allows sugar in her eating plan (albeit not much) and provides long lists of foods—including pita bread, pork roast, and yams—for her plan’s allotted three meals and two snacks per day. The regimen includes two “treat meals” each week of whatever junk food you want—as long as the meals add up to no more than 1,500 calories each. As for the exercise half of the book, “crunches,” Warner writes, “are a waste of time.” It’s all about cardio (which she admits that she hates) and her signature “power circuit” training to the point of exhaustion—or throwing up, whichever comes first.

The title of the book suggests that Americans don’t know why they are supersize. They don’t, she insists. “I fought very hard for that title,” Warner says. “It’s inflammatory, but I am tired of turning on the TV and reading diets that are not going to help.” Her approach is antielitist (the recommended foods are affordable and widely available) and pro-simplicity (don’t weigh that chicken breast; if it’s the size of your palm, it’s cool).

The book puts the spotlight on what Warner wishes Work Out would have featured more: her recipe for getting a body like hers, without the surrounding drama.







Both the book and the upcoming show offer Warner a chance at redemption by focusing on her undisputed ability to inspire people to get fit. “I am now comfortable with being a role model,” she says. “There’s a lot of judgment that comes because people feel they know me. I became someone in the public eye, but I embrace that. I own two gyms and am a role model in the fitness industry and to my trainers.” She can’t help adding, “Now I am a role model on a much bigger level. So it feels comfortable for me.” 

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