Gay Indian Author Examines Sexual Politics

BY Jeremy Kinser

September 23 2011 7:00 AM ET

GHALIB DHALLA the two krishnas X390 (MIKE ALLEN) | ADVOCATE.COM

 
The book has sold well overseas and received praise from noted
writers such as Andrew Holleran, who called it "riveting." Why do you
think the novel has resonated with such a broad audience?

While
it involves an extramarital, gay love affair, it’s about much, much
more. It’s also about a straight woman who suffers the worst kind of
betrayal at the hands of a man she has followed to ends of the world and
had a child with. And it’s also about the incredible sacrifices
immigrants make when they leave their homes for a new world in which
they might always remain outcasts. The novel explores the pitfalls of
blind faith and questions whether unexamined faith — ironic as it seems —
sets us up for the greatest fall.  I’d like to think that while there’s
no doubt our experiences are colored by our sexual orientations, we
possess the capacity to relate to any kind of art, not because it’s gay
or straight but because it speaks authentically about the human
condition. Ultimately, we are equalized by our emotions. Gay or
straight, the gravity of grief is the same, and the joy is just as
elevating. I feel incredibly blessed that after working in a cave for
years the results have been understood and embraced so warmly by my
peers.

For more information on Dhalla, visit GhalibDhalla.com.

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