Camille Bloom Is Ready to School You

The lesbian singer-songwriter opens up about her teacher-turned-rocker journey, her personal lyrics, and fighting back against those negative voices in your head.

BY Nazly Siadate

October 19 2012 4:35 PM ET

Who are some of your favorite artists and musicians?
There is this band I am loving right now called The Kyteman Orchestra, out of Holland. It’s the brainchild of one guy who put together close to a 60-piece band,  which blends hip-hop, electronica, classical, choral music, and pop to make this magical sound. I am also digging a guy named Ben Howard, an English singer-songwriter. After a show in Belgium last spring, the owner of the venue put [Howard’s album] on, and I was immediately like, "I have got to get this album! Who is this?" It was Ben Howard. I also love Alexi Murdoch, MUSE, and Coldplay.

Is there a theme behind Never Out Of Time?
Yeah. The theme is essentially that we are never out of time to do the things we most want to do in this world. Unless you are dead, or have a medical condition that is stopping you, I think there’s still time to pursue your dreams, or get clean, etc. There are a lot of songs on the album about battling addiction or making changes in your life. The song "Running Out of Time" on the album was inspired by a friend who I thought was going to kill himself with his drug addiction. It’s a personal album, and I wanted to send the message that it’s not too late.

You also dedicate time to youth at outreach centers and schools giving presentations and workshops on songwriting and music. What inspired you to reach out like that?
When I left my teaching job, it wasn’t because I didn’t want to work with kids. In fact, they were the ones that kept me in the classroom. I loved being a teacher. I knew that I needed to pursue music, but I didn’t want to stop reaching out to kids, so this was a perfect fit for me. I love doing workshops and spreading the message that there are positive ways to cope with and combat depression and rise up after living in broken homes. You can be the first person in your family to graduate college, just like me. I also direct a non-profit Rock ‘n Roll Camp in Seattle, and it is so inspiring to help young musicians find their voice.

I love "Here You Come Again." It sounds like a self-discovery song. How does this track fit into the theme of the album?
This track was really about two things: I am allergic to wheat gluten, and when I eat it, it makes me feel crazy. I felt inspired to write a riff that feels circus-like and would capture how I feel when I am "gluten’d out of my mind." Also, when I eat it — and sometimes even when I don’t — I totally beat myself up and I am filled with self-doubt. This song is directed at that voice that takes us over sometimes. It’s an awakening song about deciding not to listen to that voice.

Do you have any future albums or projects we can look forward to seeing?
I am working on songs for the next album, but that is a slow process because I have been spending so much time on the road. I am not planning to rush it at all.  That’s not how I work. Though I have thought about doing a holiday album or EP. I also really want to start co-writing with folks for side projects. So I guess I have a lot of ideas for future projects. I tend to stay incredibly busy, so I am sure you will see something in the near future!

Tags: Music

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