BY Duane Wells

September 10 2009 2:00 PM ET

"I think if those people who don’t think [gay people] should be married, if they just came and lived with my partner and I for a week, they would see just how normal our day-to-day lives are and that we’re not at all different than straight couples," Peru says with a laugh. "Having said that, they might be a little put off by my drag. But I don’t wear it every day. I would just tell them not to look in my drag closet!"

Peru, who says she accepted immediately when asked to participate in Standing on Ceremony, also has a very personal reason for getting involved with the event. Peru and her partner, Rafael, were legally married in Spain three years ago, and as a result her marriage became legal in California when the state supreme court initially ruled in favor of marriage equality. But the couple's legal standing was called into question when the court later upheld Proposition 8.

"When they [upheld] Proposition 8 our marriage fell into this limbo because when they allowed those 18,000 [California] marriages to remain legal, ours fell into this legal quagmire because no one really knew where we stood," Peru says. "So I just felt like this really does affect my life here and I absolutely wanted to be involved [with Standing on Ceremony]."

A wedding reception including cocktails, photographer, and cake will follow.



Tags: Theater

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