CDC says rare STD may surface among U.S. gays

BY admin

October 29 2004 11:00 PM ET

A rare sexually transmitted disease that is spreading among gay and bisexual men in Europe could be poised to surface in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. The CDC urged doctors and clinics across the nation to be prepared to diagnose and treat gay and bisexual men infected with Lymphogranuloma venereum. It issued the advice after receiving reports of recent outbreaks in the Netherlands, which has uncovered 92 cases of LGV dating back to 2003; it typically sees fewer than five cases per year. Although LGV can be cured by a three-week course of antibiotics, U.S. health officials could be hard-pressed to keep a lid on the spread of the infection because it is uncommon in industrialized nations and easily misdiagnosed. Efforts to combat the disease also are complicated by the tendency of some gay and bisexual men to engage in high-risk sexual behavior.

The infection is caused by specific strains of the STD chlamydia and is usually marked by genital ulcers, swollen lymph glands, and flulike symptoms. However, most of the men recently infected in the Netherlands developed gastrointestinal bleeding, inflammation of the rectum and colon, and other problems not often associated with the infection or other sexually transmitted diseases. Belgium, France, Sweden, and the United Kingdom also have reported infections. It is not known whether the U.S. is seeing a similar surge, because American doctors are not required to report the infections to local health departments.

"We expect it's a question of time before we see cases appearing here," said Stuart Berman, chief of the epidemiology and surveillance branch in the CDC's division of STD prevention. "This is an early warning." Dutch authorities found that a large number of the men recently infected with LGV had participated in sex parties and had unprotected anal intercourse in the year before getting sick. Many also were coinfected with HIV. (Reuters)

Tags: Health

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