Who's Next? The Marriage Equality Waiting Room

Which states will be the next to institute marriage equality — and just how will it happen?

BY Michelle Garcia

June 05 2013 2:41 PM ET


Long Shots/Not Unless They're Forced

The remaining 29 states all have constitutional or statutory provisions to prevent same-sex couples from marrying, and the support for marriage equality among them averages at about 38%. As Esseks says, the states with constitutional bans will require efforts to not only repeal those bans  but then to replace them with marriage equality laws. This seems unlikely to happen without a lawsuit or more LGBT or allied lawmakers in those states to start working on the effort (Georgia has three LGBT state lawmakers, the most of any of these states, and the average is less than one per the remaining states). Georgia, Florida, and Arizona also have a relatively high percentage of gay couples, similar to Colorado's.

 

22. Wisconsin, -1.402

23. Arizona, -7.12

24. Montana, -7.44

25. Alaska, -8.283

26. South Dakota, -9.569

27. Florida, -11.116

28. Virginia, -11.328

29. Ohio, -12.379

30. Michigan, -12.438

31. Wyoming, -13.494

32. Idaho, -14.44

33. Kansas, -14.445

34. North Dakota, -14.604

35. Georgia, -15.168

36. Indiana, -15.343

37. North Carolina, -16.272

38. Missouri, -16.358

39. Nebraska, -17.48

40. Oklahoma, -19.329

41. Utah, -19.338

42. Texas, -21.244

43. Kentucky, -21.327

44. South Carolina, -21.36

45. Mississippi, -21.437

46. West Virginia, -22.314

47. Alabama, -22.402

48. Tennessee, -23.345

49. Louisiana, -24.297

50. Arkansas, -24.389

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