Clinton Hails Progress in Speech to LGBT State Department Employees

The Secretary of State told a professional group for LGBT employees “creating an LGBT-welcoming workplace is not just the right thing to do, it’s also the smart thing to do.”

BY Julie Bolcer

November 28 2012 11:14 PM ET UPDATED: November 28 2012 11:46 PM ET

Now, leaders of all kinds will stand in front of audiences like this and tell you that our most important asset is our people.  And of course, that’s especially true in diplomacy, where we try to be very diplomatic all the time.  But what our success truly depends on is our ability to forge strong relationships and relate to people of all backgrounds.  And what that means for me, as your Secretary, is that creating an LGBT-welcoming workplace is not just the right thing to do, it’s also the smart thing to do. 

In part, that’s because the nature of diplomacy has changed, and we should and need to keep up.  Today we expect our diplomats to build relationships not just with their counterparts in foreign governments, but with people from every continent and every walk of life.  And in order to do that, we need a diplomatic corps that is as diverse as the world we work in.

It’s also smart because it makes us better advocates for the values that we hold dear.  Because when anyone is persecuted anywhere, and that includes when LGBT people are persecuted or kept from fully participating in their societies, they suffer, but so do we.  We’re not only robbed of their talents and ideas, we are diminished, because our commitment to the human rights of all people has to be a continuing obligation and mission of everyone who serves in the Government of the United States.  So this is a mission that I gladly assume.  We have to set the example and we have to live up to our own values.

And finally, we are simply more effective when we create an environment that encourages people to bring their whole selves to work, when they don’t have to hide a core part of who they are, when we recognize and reward people for the quality of their work instead of dismissing their contributions because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

So really, I’m here today to say thank you to all of you.  Thank you for your courage and resolve, for your willingness to keep going despite the obstacles – and for many of you, there were and are many.  Thank you for pushing your government to do what you know was right, not just for yourselves but for all who come after you.

I want to mention one person in particular who was a key part of this fight, Tom Gallagher.  I met Tom earlier.  Where is Tom?  There you are, Tom.  Tom joined the Foreign Service in 1965 and in the early 1970s he risked his career when he came out and became the first openly gay Foreign Service officer.  He served in the face of criticism and threats, but that did not stop him from serving.  I wanted to take this moment just to recognize him, but also to put into context what this journey has meant for people of Tom’s and my vintage, because I don’t want any of you who are a lot younger ever to take for granted what it took for people like Tom Gallagher to pave the way for all of you.  It’s not a moment for us to be nostalgic.  It is a moment for us to remember and to know that all of the employees who sacrificed their right to be who they were were really defending your rights and the rights and freedoms of others at home and abroad.

And I want to say a special word about why we are working so hard to protect the rights of LGBT people around the world.  And Dan Baer, who works on this along with Mike Posner and Maria Otero, have been great champions of standing up for the rights of LGBT communities and individuals. 

We have come such a long way in the United States.  Tom Gallagher is living proof of that.  And think about what it now means to be a member of a community in this country that is finally being recognized and accepted far beyond what anyone could have imagined just 20 years ago.  And remind yourself, as I do every day, what it must be like for a young boy or a young girl in some other part of the world who could literally be killed, and often has been and still will be, who will be shunned, who will be put in danger every day of his or her life. 

And so when I gave that speech in Geneva and said that we were going to make this a priority of American foreign policy, I didn’t see it as something special, something that was added on to everything else we do, but something that was integral to who we are and what we stand for.  And so those who serve today in the State Department have a new challenge to do everything you can at State and AID and the other foreign affairs agencies to help keep widening that circle of opportunity and acceptance for all those millions of men and women who may never know your name or mine, but who because of our work together will live lives of not only greater safety but integrity.

So this is not the end of the story.  There’s always more we can do to live our values and tap the talents of our people.  It’s going to be an ongoing task for future Secretaries of State and Administrators at AID and for people at every level of our government.  So even as we celebrate 20 years with Ben Franklin looking down at us, I want you to leave this celebration thinking about what more each and every one of you can do – those who are currently serving in our government, those who have served in the past, and those who I hope will decide to serve – to make not only the agencies of our government but our world more just and free for all people.

Thank you very much.  (Applause.)

Tags: Politics

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