150 Reasons to Have Pride in 2010

BY Advocate Contributors

May 10 2010 4:00 AM ET

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BECAUSE SOME OF THE BEST NEW THEATER FEATURES SMART STORIES ABOUT US (IN ADDITION TO BEING WRITTEN BY, DIRECTED BY, AND STARRING US)

History, intellect, and sex—all rarely mix so tantalizingly as in The Temperamentals (1). The new play by Jon Marans, ­directed by Jonathan Silverstein, stars Ugly Betty’s Michael Urie as one of the inner circle that devised the early gay rights group the Mattachine Society.

Though it’s not a gay show, Fela! (2) is directed and choreographed by Bill T. Jones, and it’s easily the most celebrated musical on Broadway. The New York Times has spilled a river of ink over the production about the life of titular ­Nigerian political maverick and musician Fela Anikulapo-Kuti.

The Pride (3), which went to New York City after a run in London, was written by Alexi Kaye Campbell, directed by Joe Mantello, and starred Ben Whishaw (all are gay) as well as Hugh Dancy and ­Andrea Riseborough. The three actors slipped seamlessly between London in 1958 and 2008, with gay love affairs torturing a trio of intimates.

Can anyone imagine a movie more suited to a stage adaptation than Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (4)? After runs in Sydney, Melbourne, and London, the boas and bell-bottoms are headed stateside in 2011. Just what this country needs: a cock in a frock on a rock.

The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide to Capitalism and Socialism With a Key to Scripture, by Angels in America playwright Tony Kushner, tackles the labor movement, sex, and radicalism and will be presented at New York’s Public Theater in the spring of 2011. Angels, meanwhile, will have its first New York revival this fall.

Not that Next Fall, a much-lauded intimate family drama, needed Elton John and David Furnish as producers, but the star power could hardly hurt. Written by Geoffrey Nauffts and directed by Sheryl Kaller, the Broadway play stars Patrick Breen and Patrick Heusinger as a gay couple grappling with cosmic-size questions and ­human-size heartache. 










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