Artist Spotlight: Mauricio A. Rodriguez

By Christopher Harrity

Originally published on Advocate.com April 13 2013 3:19 AM ET


Mauricio was born in Venezuela and grew up with a fascination for photographing and video-taping family trips. He rediscovered his interest in photography once he was living in America while practicing his profession as a physical therapist. Once he committed himself fully to creative photography his inspiration blossomed and now he runs his own commercial studio, RAM Imagery, in New York City. While he maintains his studio he also keeps his personal artistic output flowing by working on series like the multiple exposures here.


How did you begin working with multiple exposures?
My interest in multiple exposures started with noticing reflections and shadows on a daily basis. I remember as if it was yesterday, my first black and white portrait in film, while attending Parson's, shot through a window and the cityscape reflected in the window glass. I began to understand how the highlights, mid-tones, and shadows worked in film and started playing with the exposures both on camera and in the dark room. As I look back, cinema, holograms, and 3D imagery have always spiked my interest in creating images that have a multidimensional feel to them.  

We see sometimes only two images exposed, sometimes many more. How do you know when you are finished?
The images that I create are directly related to either a personal experience or someone else's experience or feelings, therefore the  number of layers can go from the most simple to the most complex depending on the story I'm trying to tell. But it is only when I get excited with the image that I know that it has reached its fullest potential and a story is complete whether literal or completely abstract.

The multiple exposures seem to tell more of a story than a single portrait. Can you tell us more about that?
My fascination with multiple exposures, and to make them relevant again in the industry, comes from the simple yet complicated fact that most things in life are in a constant state of change. We are constantly evolving in search of defining who we are. So I try to achieve that in my images with past, current, or future visions and experiences, making them dynamic. My mind works exactly the same way as you see my images. It's a non-stop flow of ideas, emotions, memories, and desires that overlap one another sometimes pleasantly romantic and other times disturbingly chaotic.

See more of Mauricio's work on the following pages.