Antigay iPhone App Rejected a Second Time

By Advocate.com Editors

Originally published on Advocate.com December 30 2010 3:00 PM ET

For a second time, Apple has rejected the "Manhattan Declaration" antigay app.

The "Manhattan Declaration" is a 4,700-word statement that, according to its website, was "born out of an urgent concern about growing efforts to marginalize the Christian voice in the public square, to redefine marriage, and to move away from the biblical view of the sanctity of life." The declaration espouses antigay and antichoice views.

The declaration, written in 2009 and submitted in app form to Apple in 2010, describes LGBT relationships as "immoral sexual partnerships" and "not a civil right," and included a quiz on gay civil rights and reproductive rights that awarded points for "right" answers, specifically those that were antigay and antichoice.

Apple approved the app in October 2010 before banning it the following month as the result of outcry from LGBT watchdog groups and a petition calling the app offensive. The National Organization for Marriage released a video earlier this month condemning Apple CEO Steve Jobs (pictured) for rejecting the app.

GLAAD reports that Apple banned the app’s second submission on the grounds that the app is likely "to expose a group to harm" and "to be objectionable and potentially harmful to others," the same grounds Apple gave as reasons for the first ban.

ManhattanDeclaration.org calls the ban "a statement of animus by a major American corporation against the beliefs of millions of Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox citizens. It is our sincere hope that Apple will draw back from this divisive and deeply offensive position."