Chris Kluwe's Lusty Monster Hits Minnesota Radio

By Sunnivie Brydum

Originally published on Advocate.com October 25 2012 4:10 PM ET

Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe is capitalizing on his viral letter supporting marriage equality, in which he told a Maryland lawmaker that supporting LGBT rights won't turn anyone into a "lustful cockmonster." Now he's turned the hashtag-worthy phrase into a radio ad for Minnesotans for Equality, the coalition working to defeat a proposed constitutional amendment that would define marriage as the union of one man and one woman.

ThinkProgress posted audio of the radio ad, in which Kluwe defends his support of equality, and tells an anonymous "government" announcer that as an American, he can say whatever he wants. And clarifies that he never actually referred to an elected official as a "lustful cockmonster," but rather pointed out that gay people getting married wouldn't result in such magical transformations.

After clarifying that Kluwe is married to a woman — "That's the way we like it!" says The Government — the anonymous voice starts picking on Kluwe's child-rearing.

"We don't like the way you're raising [your kids]," says The Government in the minute-long ad. "You don't care whether they grow up to marry a man or a woman."

"My wife and I believe when our girls are adults, they should be able to marry whoever they love," Kluwe responds. "We're Americans — we have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness!"

"Yes, we know," says The Government. "That's why we're changing the constitution."

Kluwe objects and tells The Government, "You can't do that!"

"Yes we can," replies The Government. "We just have to trick enough people into agreeing with us. Now say yes."

Kluwe refuses to agree with The Government, and listeners hear a door slam as a female voice says, "Don't vote discrimination into Minnesota's constitution. Just vote no. Let's show the world that love really is bigger than government."

Minnesota already has a state law banning same-sex marriage, but the ballot measure, which will go before voters in November, would put the ban into the midwestern state's constitution, making it harder to challenge in court.

Listen to the ad below.