WATCH: Louie Gohmert Compares LGBT Activists to Nazis

By Sunnivie Brydum

Originally published on Advocate.com May 11 2014 6:30 AM ET

Texas Congressman Louie Gohmert is no stranger to outlandish antigay comments, but he advanced an especially peculiar comparison on the House floor Friday afternoon, claiming that LGBT advocates are like Adolf Hitler's Third Reich, burning books about people they hate. 

In a general speech on the House floor Friday afternoon and reported by Talking Points Memo, Gohmert contended that right-wing Christians like himself "love homosexuals," but went on to explain "that doesn't mean you have to support, embrace, encourage particular lifestyles that you believe are harmful to the individuals, and harmful to society in general."

Gohmert also discussed his past experience as a judge, wherein he said psychotherapists testified before him about the phenomenon of "projecting." Gohmert went on to explain that as "someone who has a characteristic, and to divert condemnation on themselves, they project their characteristic on someone with whom they disagree."

Gohmert then invoked the recent controversy over the antigay advocacy of Jason and David Benham, whose pilot real estate reality show on HGTV was shelved after news broke of the twin brothers' active campaigning against equal rights for LGBT people. The Benham brothers and those on the right have claimed that the private television network's decision not to move forward with the show is based in religious discrimination, citing the so-called gay agenda's intention to silence all opposition. 

While LGBT activists are intent on silencing all those who disagree with them apparently using the tactics of Nazi Germany, Gohmert argued that he and his fellow God-fearing Americans are just trying to protect the moral fiber of the country from the dangers of LGBT equality, in what might be the Texas Republican's most bizarre circular argument made to date.  

"So the most intolerant in America, and especially people like were going to be on the television show before it cancelled, people like me, we get upset," explained Gohmert. "We can't stand to see our nation torn apart, can't stand to see our Judeo-Christian values on which the nation was founded demeaned, depicted as somehow evil. So we stand up for those things. But there's no hate for individuals."

Watch Gohmert's speech below, via TPM.