Life Goes On

By Advocate Contributors

Originally published on Advocate.com February 08 2011 5:00 AM ET

 Choi: “I’m going to try and finish my master’s degree at Harvard University, perhaps in some type of political or public policy field. The key lesson I learned in this journey is that you cannot limit yourself to traditional directions or methods, so my plans must remain flexible. I just joined the Gay Men’s Chorus in Boston — I’m excited to be a full part of the community. I also plan to focus more time on issues like homeless youth, post-traumatic stress disorder awareness, and the full civil rights movement. DADT repeal has served many of us well as an introductory course.”

Fehrenbach: “I’d love to continue to work for LGBT equal rights and stay involved with advocacy, especially fighting for marriage rights and helping gay youth. All of our issues are interrelated. DADT repeal will affect, even accelerate, the issues of adoption and marriage equality, among others. But most importantly, it will affect gay youth. After the rash of teen suicides, we told gay teens ‘it gets better,’ but the reality was that persecution continued into adulthood — they could still get thrown out of the military, be fired from jobs, and some couldn’t get married or raise a family. DADT repeal was just the beginning — it was the first major step to advancing acceptance. Most importantly, it was the first sign to young gays that it truly does get better.”