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Jenny Jones Guest Who Killed Gay Man Released From Prison

Jenny Jones Guest Who Killed Gay Man Released From Prison

Schmitz

Scott Amedure revealed his crush on a straight friend during a 1995 taping of The Jenny Jones Show. A few days later he was dead.

Nbroverman

It was one of the most sensational media stories of the mid-'90s: a gay guest came out during a taping of TheJenny Jones Show, revealed to a straight friend he was crushing on him while a Chicago studio audience watched, and then, days later, the gay man was shot to death by the man he adored.

Maybe even more shocking is that after serving less than 18 years in prison, Jonathan Schmitz is out of prison for murdering Scott Amedure, only 32 at the time of his death.

[RELATED: "18 Talk Show Moments That Made LGBT History"]

Schmitz, 24 at the time, claimed embarrassment over the episode led him to kill Amedure; basically, a variation of the gay panic defense. Tried twice, Schmitz was eventually found guilty of murder in 1999 and sentenced to 25 to 50 years in prison. Now walking free, Schmitz is only 47 years old.

Adding insult to injury for Amedure's family is that a $25 million civil case against The Jenny Jones Show, a tacky daytime talk show that competed with The Jerry Springer Show and canceled in 2003, was tossed out on appeal.

Nbroverman
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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.