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The Trevor Project Leaves X Over Safety Concerns for LGBTQ+ Young People

Trevor Project Deletes X Account
Image: Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images; Shutterstock

Citing increased hate speech and inadequate moderation, the Trevor Project is prioritizing mental health and secure, safe online spaces.

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The Trevor Project has announced it will no longer be active on X, the social media platform formerly known as Twitter. The organization said it was due to persistent concerns regarding the increase of hate speech and the company’s rollback of protective measures for transgender users.

The decision reflects deep-seated worries about the mental well-being of LGBTQ+ youths, particularly in light of recent anti-LGBTQ+ legislation and social media policies.

Renowned for its suicide prevention efforts within the LGBTQ community, the Trevor Project told The Advocate, “LGBTQ young people – and in particular, trans and nonbinary young people – have been unfairly targeted in recent years, and that can negatively impact their mental health.”

The Trevor Project’s statement further addressed the challenging decision to leave the platform.

“X’s removal of certain moderation functions makes it more difficult for us to create a welcoming space for them. This decision was made with input from dozens of internal and external perspectives,” the organization said.

The context of The Trevor Project’s departure from X is marked by earlier criticism from GLAAD back in April when the platform removed specific protections against targeted misgendering and deadnaming of transgender individuals from its Hateful Conduct Policy. Despite the elapsed months since that change, concerns about the safety of LGBTQ users on X remain pressing.

“The content we share on social media is intended to uplift and affirm LGBTQ young people, shedding light on stories to deepen the public understanding of their experiences,” The Trevor Project said.

They also noted the detrimental impact of hate speech on their efforts: “We’ve seen anti-LGBTQ rhetoric and commentary on our posts that can negatively impact LGBTQ young people.”

The Trevor Project underscored the critical need for social media platforms to have “sufficient moderation capabilities” to ensure the safety of marginalized communities. They cite alarming statistics as a call to action, noting that “41% of LGBTQ young people seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year.”

The Trevor Project is guiding young people towards TrevorSpace.org and is active on other social media platforms like Instagram, TikTok, LinkedIn, and Facebook to continue its advocacy work in a safer digital environment.

If you are having thoughts of suicide or are concerned that someone you know may be, resources are available to help. The 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline at 988 is for people of all ages and identities. Trans Lifeline, designed for transgender or gender-nonconforming people, can be reached at (877) 565-8860. The lifeline also provides resources to help with other crises, such as domestic violence situations. The Trevor Project Lifeline, for LGBTQ+ youth (ages 24 and younger), can be reached at (866) 488-7386. Users can also access chat services at TheTrevorProject.org/Help or text START to 678678.

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Christopher Wiggins

Christopher Wiggins is a senior national reporter for The Advocate. He has a rich career in storytelling and highlighting underrepresented voices. Growing up in a bilingual household in Germany, his German mother and U.S. Army father exposed him to diverse cultures early on, influencing his appreciation for varied perspectives and communication. His work in Washington, D.C., primarily covers the nexus of public policy, politics, law, and LGBTQ+ issues. Wiggins' reporting focuses on revealing lesser-known stories within the LGBTQ+ community. Key moments in his career include traveling with Vice President Kamala Harris and interviewing her in the West Wing about LGBTQ+ support. In addition to his national and political reporting, Wiggins represents The Advocate in the White House Press Pool and is a member of several professional journalistic organizations, including the White House Correspondents’ Association, Association of LGBTQ+ Journalists, and Society of Professional Journalists. His involvement in these groups highlights his commitment to ethical journalism and excellence in the field. Follow him on X/Twitter @CWNewser (https://twitter.com/CWNewser) and Threads @CWNewserDC (https://www.threads.net/@cwnewserdc).
Christopher Wiggins is a senior national reporter for The Advocate. He has a rich career in storytelling and highlighting underrepresented voices. Growing up in a bilingual household in Germany, his German mother and U.S. Army father exposed him to diverse cultures early on, influencing his appreciation for varied perspectives and communication. His work in Washington, D.C., primarily covers the nexus of public policy, politics, law, and LGBTQ+ issues. Wiggins' reporting focuses on revealing lesser-known stories within the LGBTQ+ community. Key moments in his career include traveling with Vice President Kamala Harris and interviewing her in the West Wing about LGBTQ+ support. In addition to his national and political reporting, Wiggins represents The Advocate in the White House Press Pool and is a member of several professional journalistic organizations, including the White House Correspondents’ Association, Association of LGBTQ+ Journalists, and Society of Professional Journalists. His involvement in these groups highlights his commitment to ethical journalism and excellence in the field. Follow him on X/Twitter @CWNewser (https://twitter.com/CWNewser) and Threads @CWNewserDC (https://www.threads.net/@cwnewserdc).