Trump Endorses Website Promoting Far-Right Conspiracy Theories

Donald Trump

Donald Trump has endorsed an alternative to the mainstream media, or, in his words, “fake news”:  MagaPill.com, a website that touts his so-called accomplishments and regularly promotes bizarre conspiracy theories.

Trump spent Saturday evening tweeting about how much he hates CNN, saying the generally pro-Trump Fox News is much better, then eventually tweeted a recommendation for MagaPill.com. “Wow, even I didn’t realize we did so much,” he said. “Wish the Fake News would report! Thank you.”

The first part of the site’s name refers to Trump’s slogan “Make America Great Again.” The second part refers to a plot point from The Matrix, in which taking a red pill allows you to see reality, while a blue pill allows you to remain in a fantasy world. “Red pill” is a term that has become “popular with white nationalists and others on the far right,” reports ThinkProgress, which has posted a thorough dissection of MagaPill.com.

The site is made up mostly of a list of Trump’s “accomplishments,” many of which are either inflated or steps that will take the nation in a regressive direction. On its Twitter feed, however, it “regularly traffics in unhinged conspiracy theories,” according to ThinkProgress.

These include sharing a video, just hours before Trump tweeted his recommendation, of fringe activist Liz Cronkin, who claims that disgraced former Congressman Anthony Weiner’s laptop computer has a recording of Hillary Clinton engaging in sex with an underage girl. Cronkin was active in pushing the “Pizzagate” conspiracy theory, alleging Clinton was running a child sex-trafficking ring out of a D.C. pizza parlor. That led a man to fire a gun inside the restaurant, and even crazed conspiracy theorist Alex Jones had to backtrack somewhat from his endorsement of Pizzagate.

MagaPill.com has also tweeted that Lady Gaga is a “spirit cooker,” meaning she engages in Satanic rituals, which is something Jones has alleged as well. Its tweets also endorse conspiracy theories about the Las Vegas mass shooting, along with theories about forced vaccination, human sacrifice, and other imaginings of the paranoid segment of the right, ThinkProgress notes.

In addition to Twitter, “MagaPill is also active on Gab, a social network favored by white nationalist and banned from the Google app store violating its hate speech policy,” ThinkProgress reports. 

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