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These drag queens are meeting with Congress to lobby for LGBTQ+ protections

drag queens Joey Jay Brigitte Bandit Jiggly Caliente
instagram @joeyjayisgay @brigittebandit @jigglycalienteofficial

Jiggly Caliente, Joey Jay, and Brigitte Bandit will meet with lawmakers on Tuesday to lobby for the Equality Act.

Three drag queens are taking to Capital Hill to lobby against the wave of anti-LGBTQ+ bills sweeping the United States, many of which aim to restrict their art.

Jiggly Caliente, Joey Jay, and Brigitte Bandit will meet with lawmakers on Tuesday, dubbed “Drag Lobby Day” by organizing group MoveOn Political Action, to lobby for the Equality Act. The legislation would amend the 1964 Civils Rights act to include gender identity and sexual orientation, encompassing the groups under federal nondiscrimination policies.

The three artists — Caliente and Jay being alumni of reality series RuPaul's Drag Race — will also lobby for the Transgender Bill of Rights. Introduced last year by Democratic legislators, the landmark law would "guarantee certain rights for transgender and nonbinary people with respect to public services and accommodations, employment, housing, health care, and other specified areas."

“MAGA Republicans have been viciously assaulting the rights and freedoms of the LGBTQ+ community for far too long,” campaign director Nakia Stephens told The Hill. “Our bodies and lives are on the line, and we will not be silenced.”

More than 550 anti-LGBTQ+ bills were introduced in 2023, and 80 were passed into law, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. Just halfway through 2024, 523 anti-LGBTQ+ bills have been introduced, with 39 passed into law. 25 of the proposed bills have levied restrictions against the art of drag, and while 20 have been defeated, five are currently advancing.

Democratic Rep. Jasmine Crockett, who is expected to appear at the rally, added in the group's statement that "the demonization of drag performers and hatred spewed by some of my Republican colleagues is both incredibly harmful to the performers themselves, as well as to any LGBTQIA person who expresses and presents themselves outside of the set of strict gender norms imposed by conservative politicians in Washington."

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Ryan Adamczeski

Ryan is a reporter at The Advocate, and a graduate of New York University Tisch's Department of Dramatic Writing, with a focus in television writing and comedy. She first became a published author at the age of 15 with her YA novel "Someone Else's Stars," and is now a member of GALECA, the LGBTQ+ society of entertainment critics. In her free time, Ryan likes watching New York Rangers hockey, listening to the Beach Boys, and practicing witchcraft.
Ryan is a reporter at The Advocate, and a graduate of New York University Tisch's Department of Dramatic Writing, with a focus in television writing and comedy. She first became a published author at the age of 15 with her YA novel "Someone Else's Stars," and is now a member of GALECA, the LGBTQ+ society of entertainment critics. In her free time, Ryan likes watching New York Rangers hockey, listening to the Beach Boys, and practicing witchcraft.