#27BiStories: When Did You Come Out? What Was the Response Like?

In their own words, bisexuals tell us what it was like to come out.

BY Eliel Cruz

August 27 2014 8:00 AM ET

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Coming out is one of the most powerful tools we have to combat ignorance and prejudice, or so said pioneers for equality such as Harvey Milk. We know that hiding in the closet not only keeps us from sharing our whole, authentic selves with our friends, family, and communities, but it can also have very real effects on our well-being

And while life in the closet can be repressive for anyone who doesn't feel safe or welcome to come out, bisexual people often face a closet with multiple doors, it seems — having to reaffirm their identity in straight spaces as well as those purported to be for LGBT people.

Facing down the kind of stigma that claims bisexual people are all "greedy," "confused," or just not "full-blown gay" contributes to overall decreased health outcomes and a greater incidence of HIV and other STIs for bisexual people, regardless of other socioeconomic factors, a recent study discovered

Hoping to shine a light on the myths about the bisexual community — both in and out of lesbian, gay, transgender, and queer spaces — The Advocate has launched a four-part series written from interviews with 27 self-identified bisexuals, all of whom happen to be in relationships. Earlier this week, we asked our sources to confont the biggest misconceptions they face as bisexual people, and today, we're turning our attention to the coming-out stories that so often unite LGBT people. 

Do those stories provide the same kind of "we've all been there" unity that many lesbian, gay, and transgender people experience when sharing their own comings-out? Or do bisexual people face ridicule and disbelief from the very people who claim to want to liberate others from the closet? Read on to find out. 

This is #27BiStories. 

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