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  • World Don't ask, do sweep

    Don't ask, do sweep

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Can the Catholic Church be saved?

    While most gay Catholics agree that the new pope is likely to be conservative, some find hope in a groundswell of support for gay equality in the parishes of Western nations

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • World 10 must-read blogs

    Blogs to the right of me, blogs to the left of me. There’s no getting around the fact that in today’s mod-a-go-go world, Web logs are where it’s at. Still, unlike most bloggers, I don’t post on my site (fablog.ehrensteinland.com) every day of the week—something my boyfriend, Bill, does almost religiously (people-vs-drchilledair.blogspot.com).

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • World The disappearing queer

    SpongeBob SquarePants is not the only victim of right-wing hysteria over queer content on TV. And children are not the only ones these moralistas are determined to protect. Conservative groups and their federal allies are scaring the networks away from anything that might be deemed indecent at Bible camp. Things that were permissible in prime time a year or two ago are now verboten. I’m not just talking about glimpses of female flesh. The big chill is taking a toll on our very visibility. Back in 2000 there were 16 comedy series with regular or recurring gay or lesbian characters. Now there are only eight, according to the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. We’re faring better in dramas, thanks to crime shows. The new series Eyes breaks the mold just by having a black gay detective, but usually in this genre we’re the victim or the perp. We can be secretaries at the precinct house, but not cops. We do get to strut our stuff in reality shows, but everyone knows queers can think fast and swallow living things. And don’t tell me it’s progressive to show gay decorators or body groomers. Even fundamentalists are willing to trust sodomites with their hair. The exception to this pattern is cable, where we still appear as fully drawn human beings. But these shows reach only a fraction of the audience that watches the broadcast networks. In the TV mainstream we’re less likely to be shown leading ordinary lives than we were a few years ago (and viewers of American Idol have reason to believe the closet is back). In short, we’re being quietly shoved to the fringes of entertainment—and not just on television. A flood of queer-themed indie movies is heading our way. But these films will open small in just a few cities and then go to video. When it comes to big-budget films, the studios seem to be growing skittish. Last year 12 features had significant or supporting queer characters. This year, so far, there’s only Brokeback Mountain, Ang Lee’s tale of queer cowboys. It remains to be seen how candid this film will be—or whether it will earn enough to impress studio heads. That won’t be easy if the movie can’t play in states where the religious reign supreme. Some theaters in those places won’t show IMAX documentaries that mention evolution; imagine how they’ll react to homos on the range.

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Just like in the movies

    Sometimes even I wonder what we’re complaining about. Heterosexuals tell us we’ve got it made. Or at least we used to. We used to want no children, no military service, and no need for commitment. Now we’re campaigning noisily for all three. Straight people are shocked. “Let them get married,” every comic from David Letterman to Chris Rock to Joan Rivers has said, “Why shouldn’t they be as miserable as we are?” Once we were the outlaws, looking for love in all the wrong places. Now we take over 3,000-passenger cruise ships. Once we were designing for Pottery Barn Kids. Now we’re shopping there. Our interest in life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness hasn’t changed, but the pursuit doesn’t look exactly the same as it used to. Even body image has changed, not in fantasy (Fox and the WB would go broke if it did), but in reality. Bears, dads, ethnics, all are celebrated now, whereas just a few years ago only clones needed apply. Yes, the swimmer’s build will probably remain the conventional ideal for some time to come, but at least everybody’s in the pool. And, once again, we are leagues ahead of the straight people—or, as I have recently been instructed to call them by a sociologist friend, the heteronormatives. I don’t know that I love this word, but it does reflect that they are still in the majority and that this old spinning globe is still one big breeders’ cup. A quick flick of your remote will reveal that, at least as far as straight men are concerned, conventional beauty still rules. Jim Belushi, Ray Romano, Kevin James, George Lopez, Mark Addy—all play fairly schlubby sitcom dads with pretty hot wives. Needless to say, none of these shows are written from the wife’s point of view. It’s the world according to Jim; it’s Raymond everybody loves. Forget that with the notable exception of Sophia Loren and Carlo Ponti, this sort of coupling doesn’t happen very often unless there are huge amounts of money involved (and Carlo made most of his money off Sophia, so that doesn’t really count). Over at the 300 CSI and Law & Order shows (one departing every hour), we have Mariska Hargitay, Marg Helgenberger, and Emily Procter solving crimes in tight-fitting slacks and clinging shell sweaters, a blazer thrown in if there’s a chill in the air. I don’t imagine many real-life female detectives rummage through their wardrobes to find these items when they are sent out on a case, not with the real-life chauvinists they have to work with constantly checking them out. But would men watch these shows otherwise? Picking apart a fake dead body holds just so much interest.

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Finding college freedom

    Picture a white male, 5 foot 11, brown hair, brown eyes, wearing a pair of Guess jeans, a red T-shirt, black nail polish, and three-inch-high white platform shoes. That was me last summer after graduating from high school in Silver Spring, Md. I strutted my stuff and didn’t care who saw me. I “vogued” down the street and at parties with my friends. I finally felt free to be me. So it may be no surprise that I had already

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Jeff vs. the bloggers

    Ex–White House reporter Jeff Gannon learned the power of gay bloggers the hard way, by being outed as a partisan operative and an alleged former hustler. Online activists have mainstream media playing catch-up, and they’re reshaping the battle for gay equality.

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • World The Amazing Lynn and Alex

    West Hollywood gay couple Lynn and Alex divided Amazing Race fans, but they managed to finish in the top five. They dish to Advocate.com about coming out on TV, befriending senior citizens Meredith and Gretchen, and—of course—their rivalry with Rob and Amber

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • Commentary Where’s the outrage?

    America’s GLBT leaders were largely silent in the wake of Sunday’s far-right (and, de facto, antigay) rally called “Justice Sunday: Stop the Filibuster Against People of Faith.” We should all be ashamed—and scared

    April 25 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Senator threatens backlash for D.C.'s support of gay couples

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Military backs away from reports of sodomy ban repeal

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Microsoft pulls support for Washington State gay rights bill

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Iowa church split over transgender member

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Man admits killing Sakia Gunn, gets 20 years

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Episcopal bishop, clergy meet to discuss differences over gay issues

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • World New Connecticut law receives mixed reaction in gay community

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Activists vow to push gay rights bill in Washington State after defeat

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • Arts & Entertainment R Family Vacations announces star-studded lineup for 2005 cruise

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • Health Court rules HIV-positive man is unfit for Foreign Service

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • Health Company pleads guilty in AIDS-wasting device case

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • Health North Carolina lawmakers consider needle-exchange bill

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • Health UCLA discovery may offer hope in preventing sexual HIV infections

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • Health Global Fund director says India has surpassed South Africa for highest HIV caseload

    April 23 2005 12:00 AM
  • World 2005 Miami Gay & Lesbian Film Festival, April 22-May 1

    The seventh annual Miami Gay & Lesbian Film Festival kicks off Friday, April 22, with a screening of Craig Lucas's The Dying Gaul and concludes Sunday, May 1, with Craig Chester's Adam & Steve. In between, the 10-day festival will offer a wide variety of short films and features of interest in the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community. For a complete

    April 22 2005 12:00 AM
  • World San Francisco "Dining Out for Life" AIDS fund-raiser set for April 28

    The annual "Dining Out for Life" fund-raiser for San Francisco's Stop AIDS Project will be held April 28 in the city. More than 60 restaurants will donate 25% of their food receipts for the day to the AIDS service organization. At least 60 restaurants in the East Bay area also are participating in the fund-raiser, the San Francisco Chronicle reports, with funds raised from those restaurants benefiting the Center for AIDS Services in

    April 22 2005 12:00 AM

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