Op-ed: Colleges Rally to Kick Chick-fil-A Off Campuses

College students will protest Chick-fil-A, warns the executive director of Campus Pride, and the organizations responsible for keeping it on campus or supporting its college bowl game should take notice.

BY Shane Windmeyer

August 16 2012 5:00 AM ET

College football's Chick-fil-A Bowl was held in the Georgia Dome in Atlanta in 2011.

Dan Cathy, Chick-fil-A president, is in for a shock when thousands of college students go “Back-to-School” this month. His antigay remarks coupled with Chick-fil-A’s near-decade-long secretive funding of documented hate groups and antigay organizations — to the accumulated sum of $5 million — adds fuel to an already burning fire. 

As the executive director of Campus Pride, the leading national organization for LGBT students and campus groups, I have heard complaints about Chick-fil-A for years now.  The company’s presence and noncompliance with LGBT-inclusive policies on college campuses has been the subject of petitions and protests for as long as I can remember.  The truth is finally out, and campuses are starting to take action.

Up until now, the only thing that has allowed Chick-fil-A to survive, in most instances, has been its clever marketing and denial that it was anything but a family-focused, Christian-run business that treats everyone with “dignity and respect.”  

The Chick-fil-A controversy has changed all that forever. The company brand has radically redefined itself as a divisive, political symbol.  It stands publicly against same-sex marriage and uses its profits to fund groups proudly and aggressively working against the rights of LGBT people, advocating their criminalization, psychological abuse and death. Among the chosen recipients of funds are some of the worst-of-the-worst: Exodus International, Family Research Council and Focus on the Family. 

I’m not surprised that a company masquerading inside of cow suits to sell chicken would trick people into believing that “family friendly” is different from “anti-gay.” Chick-fil-A and its president, however, underestimate college students and have proven that they are out of touch with the next generation’s values of respect and tolerance.

Gallup suggests that young adults ages 18 to 34 are overwhelmingly in favor of LGBT rights including 77% in support of legalizing gay and lesbian relationships. The Higher Education Research Institute’s annual Freshman Survey echoes the support for same-sex marriage and also the fact that three quarters of college students today favor adoption by gay and lesbian couples.

I have no doubt in the near future that colleges and universities will be moving away from the Chick-fil-A brand for dining options on campus.  Most campuses   — and businesses like Jim Henson Company — do not wish to be associated with a brand that has become synonymous with the funding of hate groups and espousing propaganda for an antigay agenda.

The signs of change are already here. Last week, Duke’s vice president for Student Affairs, Dr. Larry Moneta, stated that Chick-fil-A will not be returning to campus after renovations in its West Union.  This was in response to an email from an alum who objected to Chick-fil-A being on campus.  Moneta clarified that the decision was made prior to the recent controversy; however, students on campus had raised concerns over Chick-fil-A prior to renovations.  Moneta would not confirm or deny this was part of the considerations and stated in an email: “Duke University seeks to eliminate discrimination and promote equality for the LGBT and all our communities in all our endeavors.” Davidson College this past week became the first college to publicly make the decision to stop serving Chick-fil-A in association with its summer campus activities. A number of other colleges and universities also quickly distanced themselves after the controversy broke, including Emory University, which is based in Atlanta, the hometown and national headquarters to Chick-fil-A.

Will those campuses involved in the upcoming Chick-fil-A Bowl step back from it?  Will co-sponsors such as AT&T, Coca-Cola and Delta keep their brands publicly associated with funders of documented hate groups?  They have serious questions to ask if their own diversity and non-discrimination policies mean anything at all.

Nevertheless, the fervor over Chick-fil-A has escalated beyond disassociation and merely being told to not buy a chicken sandwich.  This past week Campus Pride was informed about an incident at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey where a fraternity was tabling next to the Chick-fil-A restaurant on campus. Whenever an out gay student on campus would walk past the table, the frat guys would chant: "We love Chick-fil-A” and then scream “Faggot.”  Talk about feeding hate.

Campuses have every right to deny doing business with a food vendor, especially one that creates a divisive, potentially unsafe learning environment for students. It’s just not worth it. Plus, there is no justification for a business operating on campus that directly funds hate group activity toward a population of students represented within the campus community.

Companies like Chartwells, Aramark and Sodexo who hold the food service contracts on these campuses also must be held accountable for their advocacy of the Chick-fil-A brand.  These food service contractors are the gateway for most, if not all, of the Chick-fil-A dining establishments on college campuses.  All three of these food service contractors want to be seen as LGBT-friendly businesses. Two of these companies, Aramark and Sodexo, score above 90% on the Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index for an LGBT-inclusive workplace.  Should they now?

All of this spells trouble for the Chick-fil-A brand; even Pat Robertson knows this to be true. It is not a coincidence that the televangelist took to the airwaves this past week chiding college students protesting Chick-fil-A to “shut their mouths.”  That’s exactly what Chick-fil-A hopes for – that young people will stop talking about this and it will go away. They won’t, and it won’t.

The fact is that Chick-fil-A is in serious jeopardy on college campuses and with its future consumers.  A Chick-fil-A billboard in the downtown Atlanta skyline this week reads: “WHEN YOU EAT CHIKEN, OUR FUTURZ LOOKZ BRIGHT.”  Nothing could be further from reality for the future of Chick-fil-A on college campuses.

Learn more about Campus Pride’s “5 Simple Facts about Chick-fil-A” at www.CampusPride.org/ChickfilA.

 

SHANE L. WINDMEYER, M.S., Ed., is a leading author on gay campus issues, national leader in gay and lesbian civil rights and a champion for LGBT issues on college campuses. He is cofounder and executive director of Campus Pride, the leading national organization for student leaders and campus organizations working to create a safer college environment for LGBT students. Released Fall 2006 by AlysonBooks, Windmeyer is the author of The Advocate College Guide for LGBT Students, the first-ever college guide profiling the “100 Best LGBT-Friendly Campuses.” Follow on Twitter @ShaneWindmeyer or learn more online at www.ShaneWindmeyer.com

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