Meet America's (Shockingly Small) Pool of Trans Elected Officials

As part of Transgender Awareness Week, we take a look at the men and women who are finally breaking the glass ceiling of elected office.

BY Neal Broverman

November 14 2012 5:00 AM ET

Stacie Laughton, New Hampshire House of Representatives
Women, gays, and bisexuals weren't the only boats lifted with the tide of last week's historic election. In a wonderful first, Laughton, an openly transgender woman, was elected to New Hampshire's House of Representatives and became the nation's first openly trans state lawmaker, according to National Center for Transgender Equality director of communications Vincent Paolo Villano.

Laughton made history on Tuesday with a resounding victory in her effort to represent one of three seats in Ward 4, near Nashua. Battling homelessness, advocating for those with physical disabilities, and strengthening schools are at the top of her agenda. But the Democrat is also concerned for her trans brothers and sisters: She hopes to ease the issuance of state-issued identification and allow people use of the restroom they're comfortable with.

While Laughton is not the only trans person ever elected to office, she is one of just a handful.

Read more about Laughton's peers on the following pages.

Tags: Transgender

AddThis

READER COMMENTS ()

Quantcast