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gubernatorial candidate faces ire of gay voters

Georgia
gubernatorial candidate faces ire of gay voters

Cathy_cox

Gay voters in Georgia are threatening to boycott the state's upcoming Democratic gubernatorial primary after Cathy Cox, one of the two candidates, reversed position and announced her support for a special legislative session to reinstate the state's constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.

Gay voters in Georgia are threatening to boycott the state's upcoming Democratic gubernatorial primary after one of the two candidates reversed position regarding the state constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage. Cathy Cox, Georgia's secretary of state, had been expected to carry the gay vote in her closely contested primary July 18 with the state's lieutenant governor, Mark Taylor, but that was before she announced her support for a special legislative session to reinstate Georgia's anti-marriage equality amendment, recently invalidated by a court, reports The Macon Telegraph. Previously, Cox had said that a constitutional amendment was unnecessary because Georgia law already prohibits same-sex marriage. However, she now supports the amendment, explaining in a letter to Georgia Equality that she agrees with the state legislature's effort to convene a special session to resolve the amendment's legal problems so that it won't "overshadow all other important issues" in the future, according to the Telegraph. Many gay voters in the state, especially in and around Atlanta, are calling Cox's reversal a "flip-flop," and some have demanded she return their campaign contributions. Her campaign spokesperson acknowledged returning 11 donations amounting to $8,000, reports the Telegraph. "I had a Cathy Cox bumper sticker on my car. I made a contribution. I even stuffed some envelopes for her," Joshua Stewart, 27, of Atlanta, told the Telegraph. "Now I won't be voting for a Democrat in the gubernatorial election." Added Georgia Equality's executive director, Chuck Bowen: "I think those sentiments are widespread now, especially in the metro Atlanta area." Cox had been expected to carry women and gay voters in her bid to defeat Taylor, popular among African-American voters, who make up 50% of the electorate. "It certainly could hurt her in a big way if this vote stays home," University of Georgia political observer Charles Bullock said of gay voters' influence on Cox's chances. (The Advocate)

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