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Jamaican Lesbian Can Stay in U.K.

Jamaican Lesbian Can Stay in U.K.

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Nbroverman

In what may be a watershed moment for gay Caribbeans seeking refuge in other nations, a Jamaican lesbian who fears for her life has been granted asylum in the United Kingdom.

The woman, whose name was not released, won an appeal from a previous decision that denied her asylum in Britain. This time, immigration judges agreed with her attorneys that Jamaica is "a deeply homophobic society" and her status as an out lesbian could put her at serious risk. The woman said she feared that she would be subjected to "corrective rape" -- which she was threatened with in Jamaica -- and that she may sink back into a severe depression should she be forced to return to the island nation. The woman first came to the U.K. in 2003 to study and has since begun living openly as a lesbian and entered a long-term relationship. The woman argued to the judges that after living openly for over seven years she cannot go back to her old life -- and her partner also refuses to move to Jamaica.

According to JamaicaObserver.com, many gay Jamaicans are successfully turning to Canada, the U.K., and the U.S. as venues for asylum from their home nation.

Nbroverman
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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.