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Did Mormon Leader Draw Parallel Between Rape and Gay Sex?

Mormon

Church officials finally acknowledge the #MeToo movement but manage to offend with their terminology.

Nbroverman

Since the allegations against former film mogul Harvey Weinstein came to light in the fall, few industries have been immune to charges that powerful men abused others via sexual harassment, abuse, or assault. Religious institutions have also found themselves playing defense, including the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Finally, Mormon officials addressed the #MeToo movement, with Elder Quentin Cook vaguely broaching the subject during the LDS General Conference on Sunday.

"Such nonconsensual immorality is against the laws of God and of society," he said. "However, those who understand God's plan must also oppose consensual immorality, which is also a sin."

Some observers took offense to the verbiage, saying the elder drew a link between sexual assault and other conduct perceived as immoral by the Mormon Church, such as gay sex or any sex outside of marriage.

Cook's resistance to using the words "sexual assault" or "rape" also did not go over well.

Officially, Mormon policy states that "victims of sexual abuse are not guilty of sin and do not need to repent."

Nbroverman
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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.