Investigation Finds FAMU Ignored Hazing Regulations

An investigation launched by the Florida Board of Governors after the hazing-related death of 26-year-old gay drum major Robert Champion, found that Florida A&M University ignored state and local regulations intended to prevent such practices.

BY Sunnivie Brydum

December 29 2012 12:33 PM ET

The results of a year-long investigation into the 2011 hazing death of a gay drum major at Florida A&M University concluded that the school failed to adhere to state laws and regulations about hazing, reports CBS News

Robert Champion, a gay 26-year-old member of FAMU's Marching 100 band, died in a parked bus in Orlando following a football game in 2011, after participating in a hazing ritual called "Crossing Bus C," where the drum major tried to make his way through the bus as fellow bandmates kicked and punched him. 

The report, released friday by the Florida Board of Governors, found that the school lacked internal controls to prevent and detect hazing, according to CBS. CBS also notes that the findings arrived in the same month FAMU was put on probation by a regional accrediting organization, giving the university one year to meet more stringent requirements, or have its accreditation revoked. 

The university has denied fault in Champion's death, claiming that because he was an adult, he was responsible for his own death. In May, 13 people were charged with felonies or misdemeanors in the death of the drum major. 

Tags: Crime

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