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Why Drag Race's Michelle Visage Doesn't Identify as Bisexual 

Why Drag Race's Michelle Visage Doesn't Identify as Bisexual 

Michelle Visage

The Drag Race judge has moved in LGBTQ circles since her club days in the '80s. 

RuPaul's Drag Race judge Michelle Visage considers herself a part of the "community," having been in the New York City club scene in the '80s during the height of HIV and AIDS and an ally to LGBTQ people for 30 years. Despite having been with men and women in those days, Visage doesn't ID as bisexual, which she explained in an interview with The Guardian.

Visage, a former member of the girl group Seduction, shared details about her club days in her 2015 memoir The Diva Rules.

When asked in the Guardian interview if she identified as bi at the time, she replied, "No, when I grew up that wasn't really a thing. If it was, it was gay boys who would come out as bisexual first because it was easier for them. It was just if I saw a pretty girl and I was attracted to her, why not?"

Visage, who has been married to David Case for 22 years, was then prompted to say whether or not it would be easier to respond to detractors who say she's not a part of the community by answering that she's bisexual.

"It would be easier, but I don't feel like the easy way out is always the right way out. I don't want to take anything away from somebody who's truly living a bisexual lifestyle," Visage said without expounding or being asked further about it.

As Out explains, "while the article doesn't dive into what the star meant by the comment, it seems to ride on the sentiment that bisexuals who are in opposite-sex relationships or monogamous relationships are in some way less bisexual. This is patently untrue; sexuality is about whom you are attracted to. And though Visage is certainly free to identify how she pleases, the idea gets at notions that contribute to both bi erasure and biphobia. Suffice it to say, your sexuality and identity are valid no matter who you are currently dating."

Having moved in LGBTQ circles for 30-plus years and as a judge on Drag Race, Visage did say she has witnessed a sea change in attitudes about queer people, something she's especially grateful for considering her daughter is gay.

"What I see is a lot more acceptance, a lot more tolerance," Visage said. "I have a gay daughter, so the most rewarding thing is to see a parent stand by their queer child, whereas maybe even five years ago, they wouldn't have understood."

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Tracy E. Gilchrist

Tracy E. Gilchrist is the VP, Executive Producer of Entertainment for the Advocate Channel. A media veteran, she writes about the intersections of LGBTQ+ equality and pop culture. Previously, she was the editor-in-chief of The Advocate and the first feminism editor for the 55-year-old brand. In 2017, she launched the company's first podcast, The Advocates. She is an experienced broadcast interviewer, panel moderator, and public speaker who has delivered her talk, "Pandora's Box to Pose: Game-changing Visibility in Film and TV," at universities throughout the country.
Tracy E. Gilchrist is the VP, Executive Producer of Entertainment for the Advocate Channel. A media veteran, she writes about the intersections of LGBTQ+ equality and pop culture. Previously, she was the editor-in-chief of The Advocate and the first feminism editor for the 55-year-old brand. In 2017, she launched the company's first podcast, The Advocates. She is an experienced broadcast interviewer, panel moderator, and public speaker who has delivered her talk, "Pandora's Box to Pose: Game-changing Visibility in Film and TV," at universities throughout the country.