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Marriage Equality

WATCH: LBJ's Daughters Back Marriage Equality, Think He Would Have

WATCH: LBJ's Daughters Back Marriage Equality, Think He Would Have

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The late president, a strong supporter of civil rights for African-Americans, was sympathetic to marginalized groups in general, say his daughters.

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It's impossible to say how the late president Lyndon B. Johnson would feel about marriage equality -- but his daughters suspect he would be for it, they told Katie Couric in a recent interview for Yahoo! News.

"I think my father felt very strongly that when there was bigotry anywhere, prejudice anywhere, all of us lose out," said Luci Baines Johnson. "Because it's just one more expression of hate."

Added her sister, Lynda Bird Johnson Robb: "It's hard to project what Daddy would have thought about that because that wasn't an issue that had come upon the States at that time. But I know he really wanted everybody to be able to live up to the best that God gave them."

After Lyndon Johnson, a Texan, became president upon the assassination of John F. Kennedy, he surprised his fellow Southerners and many others by wholeheartedly advocating for civil rights for African-Americans. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which he signed into law.

Both daughters see marriage equality as a matter of civil rights, and they support it. "I certainly think that, if God made you a homosexual, that you should have love and affection with somebody," Robb told Couric. "And I would not want to deny anybody that opportunity to be happy."

"It's a great civil rights concern of our day," Johnson added.

Watch a clip from the interview below, and find more of the Johnson daughters' comments on their father's legacy here.

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Trudy Ring

Trudy Ring is The Advocate’s senior politics editor and copy chief. She has been a reporter and editor for daily newspapers and LGBTQ+ weeklies/monthlies, trade magazines, and reference books. She is a political junkie who thinks even the wonkiest details are fascinating, and she always loves to see political candidates who are groundbreaking in some way. She enjoys writing about other topics as well, including religion (she’s interested in what people believe and why), literature, theater, and film. Trudy is a proud “old movie weirdo” and loves the Hollywood films of the 1930s and ’40s above all others. Other interests include classic rock music (Bruce Springsteen rules!) and history. Oh, and she was a Jeopardy! contestant back in 1998 and won two games. Not up there with Amy Schneider, but Trudy still takes pride in this achievement.
Trudy Ring is The Advocate’s senior politics editor and copy chief. She has been a reporter and editor for daily newspapers and LGBTQ+ weeklies/monthlies, trade magazines, and reference books. She is a political junkie who thinks even the wonkiest details are fascinating, and she always loves to see political candidates who are groundbreaking in some way. She enjoys writing about other topics as well, including religion (she’s interested in what people believe and why), literature, theater, and film. Trudy is a proud “old movie weirdo” and loves the Hollywood films of the 1930s and ’40s above all others. Other interests include classic rock music (Bruce Springsteen rules!) and history. Oh, and she was a Jeopardy! contestant back in 1998 and won two games. Not up there with Amy Schneider, but Trudy still takes pride in this achievement.