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Jamie Lee Curtis' Trans Daughter, Ruby Guest, Opens Up About Coming Out

Jamie Lee Curtis' Trans Daughter, Ruby Guest, Opens Up About Coming Out


<p>Jamie Lee Curtis' Trans Daughter, Ruby Guest, Opens Up About Coming Out</p>

We asked Ruby five questions about how life has been she revealed she was transgender. Here's what she said.

Oscar winner and Hollywood icon Jamie Lee Curtis is our Advocate of the Year. In addition to speaking with Curtis, The Advocate also caught up with her 26-year-old daughter, Ruby Guest. Ruby came out as transgender in 2020.

The Advocate: When did you first realize that you were transgender?
Ruby Guest: I realized around the age of 16 when a high school friend of mine asked me what my gender was. It made me think, and it made me realize that I might be. But at the time, I had other factors that kept me from transitioning.

When did you decide that it was time to share with your family, friends, and coworkers?
My wife actually convinced me. We were dating at the time, and she basically convinced me to tell my parents that I was trans. So, one weekend, I went to their house, and I didn’t actually tell them because the opportunity didn’t present itself. I messaged them afterwards and told them that I really wanted to tell them that I’m trans, so that’s how it came out.

What was their reaction?
Probably the funniest reaction, as [my mother, Jamie Lee Curtis] was trying to process everything, was that she wanted to know how much thought I’d put into this. And then her response was, “Well you know, men can wear dresses too.” So that was funny.

So, has the decision to come forward made your life better?
Well, I definitely feel more at home in my own skin, which is something I don’t think most people really understand. But since I started going on estrogen, hormone blockers, everything’s felt better, so from that point of view, I’m happier.

What would you say to a young person who is still hiding their true self?
It all depends. Different people have different situations. Some, by hiding themselves, might be safe. But if you don’t think you’re going to get kicked out of your house or if you don’t think you’re going to be in mortal danger…then come out, because you’ll feel much more relieved, even if it’s just to your friends. Or tell someone you trust. Then you can start out on your path, which includes letting everyone know what your preferred pronouns are.

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John Casey

John Casey is senior editor of The Advocate, writing columns about political, societal, and topical issues with leading newsmakers of the day. The columns include interviews with Sam Altman, Neil Patrick Harris, Ellen DeGeneres, Colman Domingo, Jennifer Coolidge, Kelly Ripa and Mark Counselos, Jamie Lee Curtis, Shirley MacLaine, Nancy Pelosi, Tony Fauci, Leon Panetta, John Brennan, and many others. John spent 30 years working as a PR professional on Capitol Hill, Hollywood, the Nobel Prize-winning UN IPCC, and with four of the largest retailers in the U.S.
John Casey is senior editor of The Advocate, writing columns about political, societal, and topical issues with leading newsmakers of the day. The columns include interviews with Sam Altman, Neil Patrick Harris, Ellen DeGeneres, Colman Domingo, Jennifer Coolidge, Kelly Ripa and Mark Counselos, Jamie Lee Curtis, Shirley MacLaine, Nancy Pelosi, Tony Fauci, Leon Panetta, John Brennan, and many others. John spent 30 years working as a PR professional on Capitol Hill, Hollywood, the Nobel Prize-winning UN IPCC, and with four of the largest retailers in the U.S.