Target Launches Gender-Neutral Kids' Collection

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A new children’s brand at Target will dismantle the pink versus blue aisle divides seen in most department stores.

Pillowfort is a line of kids’ home décor that is set to launch February 21 at the retail giant. A spokesperson says the brand, which includes designs ranging from octopi to astronauts, will show how colors and interests need not be gender-exclusive for children.

“Girls like rockets and basketball. And boys like ponies,” said Julie Guggemos, the store's senior vice president of design and product development, in an interview with the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. “Who are we to say what a child’s individual expression is? We really wanted to develop a collection that would be universal.”

Target projects that Pillowfort, which replaces its longtime brand Circo, will double sales of children’s home decor within the next three years. More than 1,200 items of furniture, bedding, and more will be in the collection. About 400 items will be available in stores, and the rest will be on Target.com.

“Target’s design team spent time with our guests — moms, dads and, most importantly, kids — to find out what makes them tick,” according to a description on the Target website. The line includes “12 whimsical themes, like ‘Tropical Treehouse,’ ‘Stellar Station’ and ‘Ocean Oasis,’” that will “cater to any decor dream a kid might conjure.”

In the comments section of this page, a customer inquired about the corporate and store policy regarding the children of LGBT parents. Target responded: "At the heart of our company are core values, which include Target’s longstanding commitment to create an environment where our team members and guests feel welcome, valued and respected. We will continue to build on this record through our support for inclusivity and diversity in every aspect of our business."

Last summer, Target ignited a social media firestorm for differentiating between “building sets” and “girls’ building sets” on its store signage. Since then, the retail chain has phased out references to gender for its children’s products.

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