Latest News

LATEST NEWS
  • World Woman in New Jersey gay marriage case has Lou Gehrig's disease

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Maine public broadcaster considers pro-gay bunny

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • World North Dakota Lutherans reject noncelibate gays for the clergy

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Religious leaders rally for same-sex marriage in Canada

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Former consultant for Jesse Helms marries male partner

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Republican lawmaker calls for end to military's gay ban

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Between a rock and a gay place

    Her sister came out to her, and that was cool—except to their fundamentalist parents, who have since begun a relentless war to “cure” their daughter. What’s a supportive sister to do?

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • Arts & Entertainment Elton John's business in the red

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • Arts & Entertainment New CD collection from Dave Koz celebrates fatherhood

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • Arts & Entertainment Beyoncé Knowles circling Bill Condon's Dreamgirls

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • World New DVD releases include <I>Bad Education</i> and Asian thriller <I>Memento Mori</i> (15694)

    15694 Entertainment News 2005-04-12 New DVD releases include Bad Education and Asian thriller Memento Mori Several new DVDs of queer interest debu

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • Health Clinton Foundation pledges $10 million for HIV treatment

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • Health Charges of sexual harassment and lax safety at the NIH, including problems with AIDS studies

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • Health Merck HIV vaccine trial kicks off in Los Angeles

    April 12 2005 12:00 AM
  • World An ideal husband

    “So let me get this straight. Are you proposing to me?” My boyfriend, a sexy clown with perpetual bedhead, shrugged and smiled expectantly. “Yes. I think so.” Six months ago, we had tabled the registering-as-domestic-partners discussion because he found the whole concept too intimidating. “It’d be too much like marriage.” He said this while folding my underwear. I suppose he found living together for three years, having his parents over every other weekend, and dish-towel shopping at Ross so free and easy that it left him with a host of other options. I decided not to take his resistance personally and let it go. One of the perks of queerdom was that my relationship didn’t have to mock the bourgeois conventions of heterosexuality. I didn’t need a legal document to affirm my relationship, and I’ve never viewed marriage as a guarantee of forever. Look at what happened to Bob and Rod Jackson-Paris. Besides, it wouldn’t be a real marriage anyway, just the closest proximity we can get in California at the moment: If I got hit by a car, he’d get to see me in the hospital, and if I died, he’d get hit with a mortgage. Just when I convinced myself that marriage wasn’t necessary, my boyfriend, Jamie, asked me to become his domestic partner in the middle of the Eat Well diner in West Hollywood. All of a sudden he’s the mature one. I was furious. I said yes immediately, then cried into my root beer float. I’ve been out since I was 14. That means I’ve been dating for 26 years. My early relationships were manifestations of my own virulent self-loathing. It wasn’t enough for me to have feelings of worthlessness; I needed proof. The incredibly hot Baptist flight attendant who always insisted we prayed postcoitus so we wouldn’t go to hell. The closeted actor who’d fly me out to visit him on location, then cover his bases by telling security I was a stalker. No matter what kind of abuse the world heaped upon gay Asian me, it was nothing compared to the disasters I willingly signed up for.

    April 11 2005 12:00 AM
  • World The beauty of coming out

    Well, it’s been a year. And everything in life seems somehow sweeter. I’ve been doing concerts for a lot of years, but since coming out in The Advocate last April, it’s as if I were taking the stage with my saxophone for the very first time—finally stepping into my shoes fully and completely. On our tour last summer, the music seemed better, the shows were more fun, and, to my great surprise, attendance at the concerts actually increased. For the past 15 years of my life, coming out seemed like the ultimate gamble. I was worried about my career. I was worried that fans would desert me in droves, that the radio station where I host a morning show would pull the plug, that my record sales would nose-dive. Simply put, I was concerned that life as I knew it would change dramatically. Turns out, I was wrong. The only thing that really changed was me. Now I can finally be “me” in every aspect of my life. The big loss I feared never materialized. Instead of losing people along the way, I gained people…and in the most unlikely ways. I also gained something else—something invaluable that I’d been searching for forever: I finally felt like a whole person. The first day that the magazine started arriving in people’s mailboxes, I got an e-mail from k.d. lang. It was one sentence—like, “Congratulations, the water’s fine.” I thought, Wow, this is amazing! Then I met David Mixner, the veteran gay rights activist, and the next month, at his request, I was playing at a fund-raiser for marriage equality at Sen. Ted Kennedy’s house in Washington, D.C. I thought, How did I get here?! Opportunities I could only imagine before were suddenly becoming my reality. I got a call from People magazine. They wanted to make me one of their 50 most eligible bachelors. Huh?! I had been trying forever to get even a CD that I’ve released reviewed in People, and with all due respect, they couldn’t have cared less. Then I do an Advocate interview, and, presto, I’m in. I scratched my head: What’s different? Why is all this happening now? Well, finally there was some kind of dimension in my life where there wasn’t before. The radio station where I work, 94.7 The Wave in Los Angeles, even used the People story as a sales tool for my show. They made this beautiful flier and sent it out to clients to drum up new business. They were proud that their morning host was in the magazine, and it made me so proud of them. I got countless e-mails and calls from colleagues and friends in radio and the music business, saying, “Way to go.” Most important, there was an outpouring of acceptance from fans—and I mean total support.

    April 11 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Religion, politics, and privacy

    In a recent episode of the NBC drama series The West Wing, characters portrayed by Martin Sheen and Alan Alda are sitting in the White House kitchen eating ice cream together. “What ever happened to the separation of church and state?” Alda asks Sheen. “It’s still there,” Sheen responds. “It’s the separation of church and politics that is the problem.” I couldn’t agree more. Consider the marriage rights of Terri and Michael Schiavo. Fifteen years ago Terri slipped into a persistent vegetative state after a heart attack cut off the oxygen to her brain. In what is probably the most difficult decision a spouse could ever have to make, Michael spent 15 years attempting to exercise his legal right to remove his wife from life support. It’s what she asked him to do in this situation, he says. The right to make medical decisions for a spouse is one of the many rights gay and lesbian couples have been fighting for in their long pursuit of marriage equality. It’s among the many rights of marriage that conservative religious groups claim need to be protected—rights, they argue, that are inviolable yet fragile and easily damaged by the influence of society. So why is it that these same conservative groups and lawmakers feel that in the case of Terri Schiavo they can redefine the very marriage rights they are protecting? They seem happy to “protect” the rights of only those people whose definition of those rights matches their own. It’s religion meddling not just in politics but in our private lives. It also brings to mind the case of John McCusker Jr., a gay businessman and community activist in San Diego who recently died of a heart attack while skiing. McCusker, 31, had made it clear that when he died he wanted a Catholic funeral on the campus of his alma mater, the University of San Diego. But John Brom, the Roman Catholic bishop in San Diego, denied McCusker’s family the right to a funeral in any of the 98 Catholic churches or chapels in the diocese. Bishop Brom labeled McCusker a “manifest sinner” because he owned two bars that catered to gay clientele. The bishop also had heard that a gay porn video had been filmed in one of the clubs. Under Catholic doctrine, the concept of “manifest sinner” is meant to be applied to someone whose sinful life is blatant, visible, and public knowledge—a serial killer, a mob boss, a pedophile priest. In cases where a late parishioner’s sin is publicly manifest, a funeral rite, which honors the dead and consoles the family, would be considered scandalous to the faithful and should be avoided.

    April 11 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Growing pains at GLAAD

    Under departing executive director Joan Garry, GLAAD has grown into a powerful media watchdog group both respected and feared—with $7.3 million in revenues. Garry’s successor faces rapidly changing media, high staff turnover, and calls to return to its grass roots

    April 11 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Here comes the new new queer cinema

    The first wave of queer cinema slowed to a trickle years ago. Now a flood of smart, fun new movies is washing into theaters

    April 11 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Learning the pains of love

    I’ve always been the lovesick boy who just wanted someone to show affection for. And when I finally met that someone, I told him. But it didn’t go very well. Standing in a grassy corner of the quad at Franklin High School with some friends, I turned to “Ricky” and finally said what had been on my mind for a month: “I love you.” “What?” Ricky shouted, his eyes opening wide and gleaming with shock. “I said

    April 11 2005 12:00 AM
  • World NAPWA congressional AIDS advocacy and training event to be held May 2-5 in D.C.

    The National Association of People With AIDS is holding its annual AIDSWatch congressional advocacy and training event May 2-5 in Washington, D.C. NAPWA holds the event each year to help train AIDS advocates to lobby members of Congress to boost funding for national HIV prevention and service programs. "Congress must hear from people living with HIV and their allies about the importance of robust federal funding and support for domestic and global

    April 11 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Maine activists fight repeal of new pro-gay law

    April 09 2005 12:00 AM
  • World North Carolina students reject gay group

    April 09 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Opponents of Connecticut civil unions promise a fight

    April 09 2005 12:00 AM
  • World Feinstein beats Lou Sheldon for dishonor in S.F.

    April 09 2005 12:00 AM

AddThis

Quantcast