Connecticut Voters Reject Convention, Preserve Marriage Equality

A ballot measure to hold Connecticut’s first constitutional convention since 1965 was defeated by voters on Tuesday by a 2-to-1 margin. The proposed convention was intended to address concerns over the general assembly’s handling of gay rights issues, eminent domain, and state spending, according to the Hartford Courant.

BY admin

November 06 2008 1:00 AM ET

A ballot measure
to hold Connecticut’s first constitutional convention
since 1965 was defeated by voters on Tuesday by a 2-to-1
margin. The proposed convention was intended to
address concerns over the general assembly’s
handling of gay rights issues, eminent domain, and state
spending, according to the Hartford Courant.

“This
election came down to basics: Most people do not want to use
the state constitution to take away people’s
rights,” Peggy Shorey, campaign manager for
Vote No, told the Courant.

Opponents of
same-sex marriage had expressed hope that a convention could
lead to a ballot initiative to ban the practice, which the
Connecticut supreme court ruled legal last month

This
particular ballot question, which can be posed to
Connecticut voters every 20 years, asks simply, "Shall there
be a Constitutional Convention to amend or revise the
Constitution of the State?"

The Connecticut
Catholic Conference -- same-sex marriage foes -- pushed
for the convention, paying for a television commercial that
urged a yes vote on Election Day.

If voters had
answered yes, delegates would be appointed by the state
general assembly and given the chance to propose any changes
to the Connecticut constitution, which provides the
framework for all branches of state government. Any
proposed changes would then go to a statewide vote,
according to the [Bridgeport] Connecticut Post.

About 40% of
voters said yes the convention, but it needed a simple
majority to pass. (Kandice Day, The Advocate)

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