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Politicians Respond to Trump's Trans Military Ban Sequel

trans ban

The nation's Democratic leaders slammed Trump's insistence on keeping alive his ban on trans servicemembers.

Nbroverman

At 9 p.m. Eastern on Friday, as the nation was unwinding at the end of another work week, the White House announced their latest iteration of a ban on transgender people serving in the military.

Trump's latest ban is similar to one he announced via tweet in July; one that has been tossed out by four courts that found it unjustified and unconstitutional. The trans ban sequel, if implemented, will still throw nearly all trans people out of the military and end enlistment for them. This time around, Trump claims his Defense Secretary, Jim Mattis, was more integral to the ban's creation and planned implementation. The supposed impetus for the ban -- that trans people are physically and mentally compromised and that their health costs are too extreme for the military's $600 billion annual budget -- have already been refuted by studies completed during the Obama administration.

Even with Saturday's March for Our Lives -- a global protest to end gun violence -- occupying much of D.C.'s energy, the nation's Democrats responded with anger and resolve at Trump's latest assault on LGBT rights.

Nbroverman
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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.