Scroll To Top
World

Former Village
Voice Photographer Dies

Former Village
Voice Photographer Dies

Fred W. McDarrah, a Village Voice photographer who chronicled some of New York's most important cultural and political events over more than three decades at the alternative weekly, died Tuesday. He was 81. McDarrah died in his sleep at his home in Greenwich Village, a day after celebrating his 81st birthday and 47th wedding anniversary, his son Patrick McDarrah said. ''Fred always knew how to be in the right place when the news was happening,'' Voice editor in chief Tony Ortega said Tuesday.

Fred W. McDarrah, a Village Voice photographer who chronicled some of New York's most important cultural and political events over more than three decades at the alternative weekly, died Tuesday. He was 81.

McDarrah died in his sleep at his home in Greenwich Village, a day after celebrating his 81st birthday and 47th wedding anniversary, his son Patrick McDarrah said.

''Fred always knew how to be in the right place when the news was happening,'' Voice editor in chief Tony Ortega said Tuesday.

McDarrah was there when the Stonewall riots erupted in 1969, marking the beginning of the gay rights movement, and when Robert F. Kennedy toured a Lower East Side slum.

He captured images of Beat generation writers Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, and photographed Andy Warhol, Norman Mailer, and Bob Dylan.

One of McDarrah's best-known images was a close-up of a youthful Dylan, dressed in a black turtleneck and jacket and giving a military-style salute.

A retrospective of McDarrah's work last year, which included candid shots of Jasper Johns, Franz Kline, Dustin Hoffman, Robert De Niro, and Janis Joplin, was hailed by The New York Times as ''a visual encyclopedia of the era's cultural scene.''

The Shooting Gallery in Los Angeles currently is showing some of his photos in an exhibit of punk and counterculture icons.

McDarrah also published numerous books of his photography, including Anarchy, Protest and Rebellion: The Counterculture That Changed America and Kerouac and Friends: A Beat Generation Album.

Born in Brooklyn, McDarrah remained on the Voice's masthead as consulting picture editor until his death. For decades, he ran the photo department, helping train dozens of young photographers at the Voice, including Sylvia Plachy, the paper said.

Ortega said he was an enduring presence at the paper, even after his retirement. ''He was constantly sending suggestions,'' he said.

In addition to his son Patrick, he is survived by his wife, Gloria; another son, Timothy; and three grandchildren. (Ula Ilnytzky, AP)

30 Years of Out100Out / Advocate Magazine - Jonathan Groff & Wayne Brady

From our Sponsors

Most Popular

Latest Stories

Outtraveler Staff