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Andrea Bocelli Out as Inauguration Performer After Boycott Threats

Andrea Bocelli Out as Inauguration Performer After Boycott Threats

Bocelli

The longtime friend of Donald Trump will not be singing at the January 20 event.

Nbroverman

It's back to the drawing board for the Trump inauguration team after its one high-profile entertainer backed out following an angry online response.

(RELATED: 7 Singers Who Could Perform at Trump's Inauguration)

Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli was supposed to join reality competitor Jackie Evancho as a performer for the January 20 inauguration of Donald Trump. Social media exploded in fury at the suggestion that the esteemed Bocelli -- a friend of Trump's -- would be publicly associated with the unpopular president-elect.

Bocelli eventually dropped out of the performance, according to Page Six. An unnamed source confirmed that the negative reaction convinced Bocelli to back out, but another source said Trump encouraged his friend to pass on the performance.

In the past, Trump's team said Elton John would sing at his swearing-in. That claim was about as truthful as most things that come from our future president.

And just a reminder, the biggest musical star on the planet sang the national anthem for Barack Obama's second inauguration.

Nbroverman
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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.