Scroll To Top

Bernie Sanders Wins Indiana Democratic Primary

Sanders and Clinton

Bernie Sanders has won the Indiana Democratic presidential primary.

With 95 percent of precincts reporting about 10 p.m. local time, Vermont Sen. Sanders has 52 percent of the vote and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton 48 percent, according to the Associated Press. Major news outlets called the race for Sanders about two hours earlier.

The state has 83 Democratic delegates, awarded proportionally. The AP shows Sanders having claimed 43 delegates to Clinton's 37 so far. Some delegates are allocated statewide, others by congressional district.

Clinton started the day with 2,165 delegates of the 2,383 needed to win the nomination, Sanders with 1,357, so she will still have a commanding lead. The AP now shows her with 2,202 — 1,682 pledged delegates, based on primaries and caucuses, and 520 superdelegates, who are elected officials and party leaders free to back the candidate of their choice. Sanders now has 1,400 delegates — 1,361 pledged and 39 superdelegates. Sanders has said he will try to persuade Clinton's superdelegates to switch to supporting him.

Both Democrats indicated their eagerness to face down Donald Trump, now the presumptive Republican nominee with Ted Cruz's withdrawal from the race today.

"There is nothing I would like more than to take on and defeat Donald Trump, someone who must never become president of this country," Sanders said in a prepared statement, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Sanders also said he would stay in the race "until the last vote is cast." 

"The Clinton campaign thinks this campaign is over," he said. "They’re wrong. Maybe it’s over for the insiders and the party establishment, but the voters in Indiana had a different idea." He urged Clinton to participate in another debate.

Clinton's campaign manager, John Podesta, looked to the general election. "Our next president will need to do two things: keep our nation safe in a dangerous world and help working families get ahead here at home," he said in a statement. "Donald Trump is not prepared to do either." Trump, Podesta said, is "too divisive and lacks the temperament to lead our nation and the free world."

"While Donald Trump seeks to bully and divide Americans," the campaign manager added, "Hillary Clinton will unite us to create an economy that works for everyone."

From our Sponsors

READER COMMENTS ()