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'That's So Gay' Still Pervasive on College Campuses, Causes Long-Term Harm

'That's So Gay' Still Pervasive on College Campuses, Causes Long-Term Harm

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Nbroverman

The pejorative term "That's so gay" remains ubiquitous on college campuses and, according to a new study, causes long-term harm to LGBT students who hear it.

Researchers at the University of Michigan queried 114 college students about the term as well as their current health. Nearly 100 of the students reported hearing the term at least once in the past year, while nearly half said they heard the phrase more than 10 times in the past 12 months.

It's not just a minor annoyance for young LGBT people who hear the phrase. The data shows queer students exposed to "That's so gay" more often had feelings of isolation and suffered from headaches, poor appetite, and other eating issues.

"'That's so gay' conveys that there is something wrong with being gay," Michael Woodford, assistant professor at the University of Michigan, told the media. "And, hearing such messages about one's self can cause stress, which can manifest in headaches and other health concerns."

Read more here.

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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.