Scroll To Top
People

Miss Staten Island Banned From St. Patrick's Parade After Coming Out

Madison L’Insalata
Madison L'Insalata

In addition to the bisexual beauty queen, two high school marching bands wearing rainbow stickers were also blocked from participating.

dnlreynolds

Miss Staten Island was banned from her borough's St. Patrick's Day parade.

Madison L'Insalata was informed Saturday night -- hours after coming out as bisexual -- that she and another pageant supporter would be prohibited from marching in the annual celebration of Irish heritage.

"It's really hurtful. Nobody likes to feel rejected from their community," the 23-year-old beauty queen told WCBS-TV, a local CBS affiliate.

Jim Smith, director of Miss Staten Island Scholarship Pageants, relayed the news to L'Insalata after being contacted by parade president Larry Cummings who was allegedly concerned for L'Insalata's "safety."

"I was stunned by the whole thing. I wasn't prepared. He just said we're worried about her safety, like he's doing us a favor," Smith said.

Regardless, L'Insalata attended the Sunday parade as a spectator wearing her sash as well as a rainbow scarf and heart-shaped sticker. Her presence reportedly sparked applause by other onlookers. Many also sported rainbow apparel in peaceful protest of the anti-LGBTQ ban.

Staten Island's St. Patrick's Day event is the only one in New York City that bans LGBTQ organizations from participating, though the Manhattan parade -- the largest celebration of Irish heritage in the world -- only began allowing queer groups in 2015.

Cummings sparked controversy -- and vows to boycott from local leaders -- by once again denying the registration to the Pride Center of Staten Island. As justification, the organizer said that the event was a "non sexual-identification parade."

In addition to L'Insalata, two Staten Island high school marching bands were prohibited from marching after refusing to take off their rainbow heart stickers. City Councilman Joseph Borelli claimed he was "physically blocked" from participating for wearing a small Pride pin, reports the New York Post.

"I knew that people would talk about it, and that's all I wanted. Because the more people that know about it, the more likely it is to change," L'Insalata said.

dnlreynolds
Advocate Channel - The Pride StoreOut / Advocate Magazine - Fellow Travelers & Jamie Lee Curtis

From our Sponsors

Most Popular

Latest Stories

Daniel Reynolds

Daniel Reynolds is the editor of social media for The Advocate. A native of New Jersey, he writes about entertainment, health, and politics.
Daniel Reynolds is the editor of social media for The Advocate. A native of New Jersey, he writes about entertainment, health, and politics.