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Adam Lambert tells homophobes to 'Get over it. Mind your own business' (exclusive)

Adam Lambert performs onstage OUTLOUD Music Festival 2024 WeHo Pride
Amy Sussman/Getty Images

The global music superstar has new EDM songs and a new EP coming out, that is at once dramatic and dreamy — perfect for the Pride season.

Adam Lambert’s Pride festivities started off with a bang when he headlined WeHo Pride during the first weekend in June.

“It was great to see the community out there,” he told The Advocate recently. “It felt like a very supportive celebration, all of us together. You know, I lived in West Hollywood for over 20 years, and I've never performed in Pride, so it was a long time coming, and it felt great.”

For Lambert, attending Pride events began in his early twenties in San Diego, when he attended his first after just graduating from high school. Since then, he’s attended dozens over the years and he’s seen many changes.

“For example, drag was not what it was now. We have so many of our drag superstars in our community who have become such a focal point and an exciting sort of representation of everything we are. And so you see a lot more drag in Pride events which is a great thing.”

Since those early days in San Diego, another element has changed for Lambert. In 2009 he rose to fame, finishing second in the eighth season of the hit show American Idol. Since that time, and over a decade, he’s become a music sensation, selling millions of albums and singles worldwide. Since 2012, he has performed as the lead singer for the iconic rock group Queen. They just completed a global tour late last year, their first since the pandemic.

Now, as a confirmed global superstar, he’s also headlined Pride events. “I did London last year, and have been to Miami, Pittsburgh, and I did Mardi Gras in Australia, so it’s such a privilege to be a part of these events all over the place,” he said.

Lambert has noticed a spirit of rebellion that streaks through Pride events. “I think people really feel so much more empowered, and that they can be exactly what and who they are.”

This feeling of empowerment, at least sexually, is front and center in his new music, a collection set to release next month, of EDM songs and a new EP. It includes two just released songs, “Lube” and “Wet Dream.” He’s releasing the third song from the EP tomorrow (midnight ET) called “CVNTY.”

“Very subtle,” Lambert jokes. “It’s a little bit of a break from rock and Queen music.”

He continued: “I'm singing about intimacy, partying, hedonism and lust and all the wonderful things that make us…bedroom creatures! It's a lot of fun. It's fast. There's some theatricality to it. It has some drama to it, and it’s dreamy, I think those are the two words that I would give it.”

Lambert’s in-your-face and take-no-prisoners new music is a perfect reflection of what he feels our community should be doing right now in the face of so much homophobia and bigotry.

“Their hate is not going to dull my light. In fact, in some ways, it fuels my fire. I feel like now more than ever, it’s time to express whatever I want to express. And if someone has a problem with it, I would prefer if they just ignored me. You got a problem with it? Get over it. Mind your own business,” he said. “I don't understand why the haters out there focus so specifically on things they don't like. You don't have to like everything. That's society. We're in a free world. We're supposed to be in a free society, where everyone has the freedom to express themselves as long as you're not hurting anybody. There’s plenty more that we need to be focusing on other than who people are sleeping with and what identity people want to see themselves as.”

Lambert compared the animosity toward queer people to a pendulum swinging back and forth.

“We've been dealing with this forever. If you look back at the last 15 years, there's been a lot of progress. We pushed really hard, and our community has come a very long way, and of course, there's going to be pushback, but I hope that anybody out there seeing that hate and seeing that negativity takes it - now I know this sounds strange - as a compliment.”

What he means is the progress has been so positive over the last few years, with our community doing a great job moving forward, and demanding equal rights.

“These types of people wouldn't be so threatened. So, it's just a response to the beautiful work we've done as a community,” he said.

Lambert has hopes for the younger generations of queer youth.

“I think we all can take pride in the next generation coming up. I don't think they're going to be intimidated into hiding. There's a real, bold sense of self in our community now. People are empowered to be verbal and public about who and what they are in a way that we've never had before. There will be attempts to censor us and to dim our light and quiet us down. But I really don't think it's going to work.”

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John Casey

John Casey is senior editor of The Advocate, writing columns about political, societal, and topical issues with leading newsmakers of the day. The columns include interviews with Sam Altman, Neil Patrick Harris, Ellen DeGeneres, Colman Domingo, Jennifer Coolidge, Kelly Ripa and Mark Counselos, Jamie Lee Curtis, Shirley MacLaine, Nancy Pelosi, Tony Fauci, Leon Panetta, John Brennan, and many others. John spent 30 years working as a PR professional on Capitol Hill, Hollywood, the Nobel Prize-winning UN IPCC, and with four of the largest retailers in the U.S.
John Casey is senior editor of The Advocate, writing columns about political, societal, and topical issues with leading newsmakers of the day. The columns include interviews with Sam Altman, Neil Patrick Harris, Ellen DeGeneres, Colman Domingo, Jennifer Coolidge, Kelly Ripa and Mark Counselos, Jamie Lee Curtis, Shirley MacLaine, Nancy Pelosi, Tony Fauci, Leon Panetta, John Brennan, and many others. John spent 30 years working as a PR professional on Capitol Hill, Hollywood, the Nobel Prize-winning UN IPCC, and with four of the largest retailers in the U.S.