Scroll To Top

Trump Campaign Manager: Seven Sisters Schools Are "A Bunch of Dykes"

STEPHEN BANNON

Donald Trump’s campaign manager, Stephen Bannon, reportedly referred to students at the Seven Sisters colleges as “dykes” during a 2011 interview.

Bannon, who was brought on to the campaign earlier this month, told Political Vindication Radio that women like Sarah Palin, Ann Coulter, and Michele Bachmann “threaten the progressive narrative,” as BuzzFeed reports.

Such female conservatives pose a threat to liberal women, he said, because they are not “a bunch of dykes that came from the Seven Sisters schools.”

“And so these women cut to the heart of the progressive narrative,” Bannon said.

“That’s why there are some unintended consequences of the women’s liberation movement,” he continued. “That, in fact, the women that would lead this country would be pro-family, they would have husbands, they would love their children. They wouldn’t be a bunch of dykes that came from the Seven Sisters schools up in New England. That drives the left insane and that’s why they hate these women.”

The colleges that make up the Seven Sisters schools include Smith, Radcliffe, Bryn Mawr, and Wellesley, institutions historically exclusive to women.

Bannon, the former executive chairman of Breitbart News, has come under fire recently as reports surface about his storied professional and personal history, which include allegations of domestic violence, sexual assault, racism, and anti-LGBT sentiment.

Kurt Bardella is a former spokesman for Breitbart, a conservative website viewed as the mouthpiece of the “alt-right.” He quit the company earlier this year, citing a toxic workplace environment. “[Bannon] made more off-color comments about minorities and homosexuals than I can recount,” Bardella told The Daily Beast of his former boss.

A former employee, Julia Panely-Pacetti, sued Bannon in 2005, alleging that he terminated her during her maternity leave. The plaintiff, who also suffers from multiple sclerosis, claimed that she was let go after giving birth, the New York Daily News reports.

Bannon and an associate were accused of sexual assault in 1994 by a coworker at Biosphere 2, a research facility in Oracle, Ariz., reports BuzzFeed. Bannon once told his accuser that she “was a woman in a man’s job.” The woman said she danced with Bannon at a company party and he “held my wrist tightly and told me that once I’d done it with him I’d never want to do it with anyone else."

The most damning claims against Bannon, however, were made by his ex-wife, Mary Louise Piccard, who accused him of attacking her during their marriage.

In February 1996, police charged Bannon with “domestic violence, battery and attempting to dissuade a witness,” according to The New York Times. Bannon reportedly threatened Piccard to keep her from appearing in court to testify against him. Bannon allegedly told her that if he were put in prison, she “would have no money and no way to support the children.”

The charges against Bannon would be dropped.

These allegations may be unsurprising to LGBT readers, as Bannon’s former website is known to use anti-LGBT slurs in its reporting.

In responding to a series of transphobic tweets from former Boston Red Sox player Curt Schilling, Breitbart referred to criticism of his views as the “Big Tranny Hate Machine.” Discussing domestic violence in same-sex relationships, the word “dyke” is used four times.

From our Sponsors

READER COMMENTS ()