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Former KKK Leader David Duke Banned From Twitter

Duke
Image via Southern Poverty Law Center

Twitter is more aggressively tamping down on hate and lies.

Nbroverman

Twitter has permanently suspended former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke -- a man referred to as a neo-Nazi by the Southern Poverty Law Center -- from its platform.

Duke repeatedly violated the social media site's rules on "hateful conduct," according to Twitter and first reported by the Associated Press. Twitter did not note specific tweets that caused the ban against Duke, but the company has been cracking down on messages that incite violence, promote hate, and spread lies.

Duke led the racist, anti-Semitic, and homophobic KKK in the 1970s. He ran unsuccessfully for president several times, but did get elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives in 1989. He ran, also unsuccessfully, for Louisiana governor in 1991. His political ambitions mostly ended after being sent to prison in 2002 for tax evasion and mail fraud (he embezzled from his racist followers to pay for luxury goods, gambling expenses, and home improvements, according to the SPLC).

Espousing white supremacy and hatred of Jews and sexual and gender minorities, Duke is not surprisingly a big supporter of Donald Trump. Duke has said, "Voting against Donald Trump, at this point, is really treason to your heritage."

Nbroverman
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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.