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Did Ivanka and Hillary Finally Force Trump to Confront Anti-Semitism?

Did Ivanka and Hillary Finally Force Trump to Confront Anti-Semitism

President Trump finally denounces attacks on Jewish intsitutions, but it came after his daughter and presidential rival tweeted similar messages.

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With dozens of threats to Jewish community centers and a high-profile vandalism of a St. Louis synagogue, President Trump was under pressure to address the apparent rise of anti-Semitism in the nation.

"I think it's terrible, I think it's horrible, whether it's anti-Semitism or racism or anything you want to think about having to do with the divide," Trump told NBC News during a visit to the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture. "Anti-Semitism is horrible, and it's gonna stop and it has to stop."

The president echoed those statements again at the D.C. museum: "The anti-Semitic threats targeting our Jewish community at community centers are horrible and are painful and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil."

Trump's serious address of the issue feels like a 180-degree turn from last week's press conference, where he snapped at and dismissed a Jewish reporter who asked about the rise of hate crimes. "Sit down," Trump told the journalist.

What brought about the change? Could it be a desire for a better news week than last, which included the disastrous press conference, continuing fallout from the resignation of National Security Director Michael Flynn, more investigations into his campaign's connections with Russia, and an escalating war with the media? Possibly, but it may have something to do with two women who he has expressed immense respect for -- his daughter, Ivanka, and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, his bitter rival in last year's presidential election. Both women tweeted out messages about the anti-Semitic attacks, with Clinton imploring Trump to say something.

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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.