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MSNBC Denies Ronan Farrow Cancellation Report

MSNBC Denies Ronan Farrow Cancellation Report

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The MSNBC host, a supporter of LGBT causes, will be keeping his show, network officials say.

Lifeafterdawn

MSNBC anchor and LGBT ally Ronan Farrow will keep his show and his job, says a spokeswoman for the cable network, telling The Advocate that reports of the show's cancellation are "not true."

Mediaite reported Monday that according to "a well-placed source," MSNBC plans to cancel Ronan Farrow Daily as part of a programming shakeup. An MSNBC official also denied the cancellation plans to Mediaite, saying the network remains "fully committed to Ronan."

Since his show premiered in February, the anchor, son of actress Mia Farrow, has been outspoken in support of LGBT causes, going to bat on behalf of transgender people on several occasions (see here and here). Some media observers have speculated that he is gay or bisexual, but he has been silent concerning his love life.

Farrow's show is reportedly tanking in the ratings. Calling it "largely a dud," The New York Times reported Sunday that Ronan Farrow Daily had ratings 51 percent lower than programming in the same time slot last year among viewers in the most desirable 25-to 54-year-old demographic. MSNBC, the Times added, has been suffering a network-wide slide that has affect even hits such as The Rachel Maddow Show and Morning Joe.

Farrow and his representative did not respond to requests from The Advocate for comment. However, Tuesday afternoon he did cryptically tweet, "I'm an Azealia Banks guy in an Iggy Azalea world, " referring to the American and Australian rappers, respectively.

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The Advocate's news editor Dawn Ennis successfully transitioned from broadcast journalism to online media following another transition that made headlines; in 2013, she became the first trans staffer in any major TV network newsroom. As the first out transgender editor at The Advocate, the native New Yorker continues her 30-year media career, in which she has earned more than a dozen awards, including two Emmys. With the blessing of her three children, Dawn retains the most important job title she's ever held: Dad.
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