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Sandra Bernhard on Her Bi Roseanne Character and White Women Supporting Trump

Sandra Bernhard on Her Bi Roseanne Character and White Women Supporting Trump

Sandra Bernhard

The comedian spoke to MSNBC's Ari Melber about the Roseanne reboot and why women like Roseanne Barr may be intimidated by Hillary Clinton.

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Sandra Bernhard made history in 1992 for playing one of the first high-profile bisexual people on television. Her Roseanne character -- Nancy Bartlett -- was funny, sexy, and entirely comfortable with herself.

Bernhard's depiction of Nancy is one of the reasons so many LGBT people think of Roseanne so fondly -- and also why some are so disappointed that the sitcom now revolves around a Trump supporter.

Bernhard, who's out herself, appeared on The Beat With Ari Melber on Wednesday to talk about the show's legacy and its controversial reboot. Bernhard laughed at how groundbreaking her bisexual character was before explaining the origins of Nancy's sexuality. Melber then asked Bernhard's take on white women who support Trump -- like Roseanne Barr -- and she indicated that she thinks some are "under the thumb of [their] husband[s]" or it's about being "so offended by Hillary Clinton" or "feeling inadequate." Clinton's education and position is "intimidating to a lot of women," Bernhard said.

Watch the frank discussion below.

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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.