Fight to the Finish

Is Prop. 8 unconstitutional, or should the voters have a chance to overturn it in 2010? Depends on whom you ask -- just know that some of the big names in marriage equality aren't quite seeing eye to eye.

BY Neal Broverman

May 08 2009 12:00 AM ET

Now that there's a
tidal wave of states endorsing same-sex marriage, Tyler
believes California's supreme court judges "may be
thinking not about [their own] reelection, but more
about their legacy."

Tyler's aggravation
is not directed toward Equality California; she feels
Solomon was simply playing catch-up after Osborn and
Jacobs made their intentions known. Solomon was
approached for comment but did not respond by deadline.

Osborn -- who
previously worked as an aide to Los Angeles mayor Antonio
Villaraigosa, worked extensively on the Obama campaign, and is
an ex-partner of Tyler's -- says her Sunday
announcement will have no effect on the California supreme
court.

"I've been
around long enough to know what the supreme court responds to
and what they don't," Osborn says. "Believe me,
our organizing has no impact on the supreme court. That's
just naive on Robin's part. The relevancy here is that with
the historic wave of now five states and three more set to turn
[on same-sex marriage], and the public discussion of this in
the new Obama era, history is just sweeping forward.
There's this unstoppable wave for equality. I just think
her call on this is mistaken. The most important part is
capturing this upsurge of activism and turning it into a real
kick-ass campaign that beats the right-wing at their own
game."

Should a ballot
campaign become necessary to overturn Prop. 8, Osborn thinks
next year is the way to go: "I know we're not going to
lose."

Tags: Politics

AddThis

READER COMMENTS ()

Quantcast