Scroll To Top
News

Americans still support marriage equality by a vast majority — just not Republicans

lesbian wedding matching rings
Shutterstock Creative

More than two in three Americans still believe that marriage equality should be the law of the land, despite a slight dip in support.

The Republican Party and its voters are growing increasingly out of touch with the rest of the United States when it comes to LGBTQ+ rights.

More than two in three Americans (69 percent) still believe that marriage equality should remain the law of the land, according to a new survey from Gallup, despite the slight dip down from the record high of 71 percent recorded in 2022 and 2023.

The poll found that 83 percent of Democrats support marriage equality, compared to 74 percent of Independents. Conversely, only 46 percent of Republicans support same-sex couples having the right to marry, down significantly from 55 percent in 2021 and 2022.

"For over two decades, Republicans have lagged behind Democrats and independents in these beliefs," the report states. "Although the longer-term trends have shown increased support among all three party groups, the past two years have seen a leveling off, if not a decline, in that support."

Nearly as many Americas voiced support for LGBTQ+ relationships regardless of marriage, with 64 percent saying they believe that same-sex relationships are "morally acceptable." Democrats only saw a slight decline from those who support marriage equality, with 81 percent saying gay and lesbian relationships are "morally acceptable." Independents saw a larger dip with 68 percent in support. Only 40 percent of Republicans agreed.

While the report did not examine the cause of the slight attitude shift among Americans, it comes at a time where a wave of anti-LGBTQ+ legislation is being proposed and passed across the country. More than 550 anti-LGBTQ+ bills were introduced in 2023, and 80 were passed into law, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. Just halfway through 2024, 523 anti-LGBTQ+ bills have been introduced, with 39 passed into law.

However, the report noted that as "younger Americans are consistently more likely than older Americans to favor legal same-sex marriage and to view same-sex relations as morally acceptable, public support should resume its growth at some point in the coming decades, should younger adults and new generations entering adulthood maintain higher levels of support."

30 Years of Out100Out / Advocate Magazine - Jonathan Groff & Wayne Brady

From our Sponsors

Most Popular

Latest Stories

Ryan Adamczeski

Ryan is a reporter at The Advocate, and a graduate of New York University Tisch's Department of Dramatic Writing, with a focus in television writing and comedy. She first became a published author at the age of 15 with her YA novel "Someone Else's Stars," and is now a member of GALECA, the LGBTQ+ society of entertainment critics. In her free time, Ryan likes watching New York Rangers hockey, listening to the Beach Boys, and practicing witchcraft.
Ryan is a reporter at The Advocate, and a graduate of New York University Tisch's Department of Dramatic Writing, with a focus in television writing and comedy. She first became a published author at the age of 15 with her YA novel "Someone Else's Stars," and is now a member of GALECA, the LGBTQ+ society of entertainment critics. In her free time, Ryan likes watching New York Rangers hockey, listening to the Beach Boys, and practicing witchcraft.