BY Kerry Eleveld

March 23 2010 1:50 PM ET

Larry Korb of the Center for American Progress told The Advocate Tuesday that he believed officials at the Pentagon are trying to "slow-walk" repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy.

"They're dragging their feet," said Korb, senior fellow at the center, who was among a delegation from the center that met with DOD officials regarding the yearlong implementation study ordered by Defense secretary Robert Gates.

"Again, it's just one meeting with one group, but having been in the building — having dealt not with this issue but with women — I got the impression that these people are going to slow-walk it." Korb served as assistant secretary of Defense in the early- to mid-'80s when the Pentagon was debating the issue of allowing women to serve in combat positions. "They have a lot of other things they're worried about. I don't get the
impression that this is a high priority," Korb added, referring to the
implementation of repeal.

Korb made the comments following a panel discussion on the release of a new report from the center, called "Implementing the Repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell' in the U.S. Armed Forces." Korb was discussing the yearlong review that is due in December from a three-member working group made up of Jeh Johnson, general counsel for the Department of Defense; Clifford Stanley, undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness; and Gen. Carter Ham of the U.S. Army.

Korb declined to say specifically who was in the meeting, only that Center for American Progress representatives were there and that it took place at the Pentagon.





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