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Sen. Claire McCaskill to Orrin Hatch: Your Tax Bill Is a Fraud

McCaskill

The Missouri senator was visibly angry at the Republican ruse, telling her Utah colleague he's benefiting corporations at the expense of lower- and middle-class people.

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Democratic Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill boiled over this week when she realized the Republicans' bait-and-switch on their proposed tax overhaul.

As part of their tax bill, the Republicans propose repealing the Obamacare mandate -- a fee levied on those who don't sign up for health coverage. Those funds will be end up being replaced by lower-income people -- for the benefit of corporations -- McCaskill pointed out.

"If you're getting rid of [the mandate and the money it generates] how does miraculously $320 billion show up for you to spend on corporations? I'll tell you why, because you're eliminating $185 billion in payments of subsidies to people who are getting insurance," McCaskill said, directing her ire at Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch.

The Utah senator contended that the bill would not cut Medicaid, but the Congressional Budget Office disagreed -- their analysis said Medicaid would see $25 billion in cuts and add $1.5 trillion to the deficit.

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Neal Broverman

Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.
Neal Broverman is the Editorial Director, Print of Pride Media, publishers of The Advocate, Out, Out Traveler, and Plus, spending more than 20 years in journalism. He indulges his interest in transportation and urban planning with regular contributions to Los Angeles magazine, and his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. He lives in the City of Angels with his husband, children, and their chiweenie.