This Scream Queens Episode Really Bothered Antonin Scalia's Son

This Scream Queens Episode Really Bothered Antonin Scalia's Son

Has the "violent anger of many on the left" been unmasked by Scream Queens?

In a recent episode of the campy Fox horror show from out cocreator Ryan Murphy, a murderous attacker dressed as Antonin Scalia got beaten up by Jamie Lee Curtis. Today, in a new column for conservative magazine The Weekly Standard, the Supreme Court justice's son says the episode demonstrates "the violent anger of many on the left."

"She takes particular delight in knocking the Scalia-guised assailant to the ground," writes Christopher Scalia, "punching him like Ronda Rousey Holly Holm and talking to him like Linda Greenhouse. Between every punch to the face, she makes a claim that, presumably, is meant to rebut something Justice Scalia has said."

The younger Scalia argues that not only is the violence a clue into his dad's role as the "bogeyman of the liberal imagination," but also that the show's claims about the justice's views are inaccurate.

Scream Queens isn't exactly 60 Minutes. In the scene in question, three masked attackers show up wielding knives and corner Curtis's character. She explains in a fairly silly monologue how she secretly learned to fight by having an affair with a martial arts master.

With one punch to the masked Scalia's head, Curtis says, “The homosexual lifestyle is not destructive to the fabric of American society!”

She unloads a series of one-liners on same-sex marriage, the Voting Rights Act, and Obamacare before each smack. Watch the whole scene for yourself below.

While Christopher Scalia doesn't appear to argue that his dad actually supports marriage equality, he thinks the writers took his dad out of context. 

"She’s making rejoinders to claims that Justice Scalia never made," he writes. "'The homosexual lifestyle is not destructive to the fabric of American society!' is probably a reference to his dissent in this summer’s Obergefell decision, which begins: 'I write separately to call attention to this Court’s threat to American democracy.' His point was that the Court threatened democracy by usurping the role of the legislature. But that’s not as good a reason to punch him."

It's hard to argue that Scalia sees being gay as anything less than destructive if looking back on his numerous rulings. Take Lawrence v. Texas in 2003, for example, in which Scalia wrote:

"Many Americans do not want persons who openly engage in homosexual conduct as partners in their business, as scoutmasters for their children, as teachers in their children’s schools, or as boarders in their home. They view this as protecting themselves and their families from a lifestyle that they believe to be immoral and destructive. The Court views it as ‘discrimination’ which it is the function of our judgments to deter. So imbued is the Court with the law profession’s anti-anti-homosexual culture, that it is seemingly unaware that the attitudes of that culture are not obviously ‘mainstream.’”

The Advocate has previously aggregated some of "Justice Antonin Scalia's Greatest Fits" about LGBT equality. They span from Romer v. Evans in 1996 all the way to present day, with many options for Scream Queens writers to pick from if they want to demonstrate that Scalia isn't merely arguing over technicalities.

Watch the Scream Queens scene below:

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