Scroll To Top
World

Italian
legislators cause outrage after placing same-sex dolls in
nativity scene

Italian
legislators cause outrage after placing same-sex dolls in
nativity scene

Two leftists in Italy's ruling coalition on Wednesday outraged fellow lawmakers by placing four dolls representing two gay couples near the Baby Jesus in the official Nativity scene in parliament in Rome. The two parliamentarians from the small "Rose in the Fist" party said their gesture was to promote the legalization of same-sex marriage and granting legal recognition to unmarried couples. Bruno Mellano and Donatella Poretti placed the Barbie and Ken-type dolls in the parliamentary Nativity scene, each couple lying down embraced among the shepherds witnessing the birth of Jesus. Each of the two doll couples, which parliamentary ushers removed after a few minutes, wore miniature placards with slogans in favor of gay rights. "This is a vulgar and unacceptable double-attack against both a [national] institution as well as a religious symbol," a group of women parliamentarians of the opposition conservative Forza Italia party said in a statement. Luca Volonte, a member of the small centrist opposition party Union of Christian Democrats, called the gesture a "pure attack against the religion practiced by the majority of Italians." Italy is overwhelmingly Roman Catholic, and nativity scenes, featuring figures of the Baby Jesus, Mary, Joseph, shepherds, animals, and three kings bearing gifts, are displayed in many homes, squares, and shops. Some members of the opposition demanded the lawmakers be censured by the speaker of the lower house of parliament. But even the Italian Communist Party, which supports gay rights and is also in the ruling coalition of Prime Minister Romano Prodi, distanced itself from the action. One communist parliamentarian called it "a grave political error" that would not help gays. The two leftist politicians carried out their gesture just before Pope Benedict XVI, speaking to pilgrims and tourists at the Vatican, said Christmas creches were part of Christian culture that had to be defended. In recent weeks several state schools have decided not to erect Nativity scenes. Some shops decided not to sell them, saying they were not popular or did not fit their image. But even education minister Giuseppe Fioroni has criticized such schools, saying they had gone too far in banning Nativity scenes, which could instead be used as tools for interreligious dialogue. (Reuters)

Advocate Magazine - KehlaniAdvocate Magazine - Gus Kenworthy

From our Sponsors

Most Popular

Latest Stories